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Steadicam, bodymount or helmet cam for POV?


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#1 Marcus Joseph

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Posted 14 February 2012 - 10:07 PM

I've been kind of thinking about this for sometime and can't quite decide what aesthetic choice I should go for. It's a big part of the short as it will all be shot on what I choose. The cost will vary as well, I originally had the decision to just go steadicam but now I am not sure, it may be too far away from the operator's body to appear as a point of view with the big arm in the way. But all the other options (bodymount, helmet) may be a bit too shaky for my liking and pull the viewer out of the story.

I am thinking about a 14 or 16mm lens or something, if anyone posts what they think about a point of view sequence, it would all help immensely.

There will be some walking as well and then most of it is just a dialogue.
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 03:05 AM

it may be too far away from the operator's body to appear as a point of view with the big arm in the way.


It's the camera giving the POV, rather than the operator, it becomes an issue with the Steadicam if you need to see parts of the character's own body - well more than the hand.
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#3 Marcus Joseph

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 04:31 AM

It's the camera giving the POV, rather than the operator, it becomes an issue with the Steadicam if you need to see parts of the character's own body - well more than the hand.

Yeah, I sometimes feel even the hand stuff can be a bit gimmicky. There's only instance where I'd even want to see a hand in this thing, which is when one character holds up a torch and it only has to be with one hand (other hand can still hold on to a steadicam). The rest with dialogue doesn't really matter as much. I think most people pull it off with helmets or body mounts, I'm thinking I could try to pull off something a little different for a change, of course the cost of the whole thing goes up a bit.

Here is a steadicam pov in Goodfellas


And here's one in Halloween, notice how the kid's hand looks a bit awkward, I am not sure if the operator could chuck his hand in even if the character wasn't a kid. Especially with the size of the steadicam rigs back then (in German, only upload I think)

Edited by Marcus Joseph, 15 February 2012 - 04:32 AM.

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#4 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 04:54 AM

The Steadicam I rigs around Halloween time were pretty light, using an Arri 35 IIC, and were operated using one hand, the two handed method was developed on "The Shining". The other traditional POV shot used a handheld camera. The hand and arm picking up the knife in the Halloween shot does rather look like an actor's hand (although, perhaps not totally impossible if operating with the left hand), opening doors with a hand would tend to the usual sort of operator acting.

Edited by Brian Drysdale, 15 February 2012 - 04:57 AM.

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#5 Marcus Joseph

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 09:44 AM

The Steadicam I rigs around Halloween time were pretty light, using an Arri 35 IIC, and were operated using one hand, the two handed method was developed on "The Shining". The other traditional POV shot used a handheld camera. The hand and arm picking up the knife in the Halloween shot does rather look like an actor's hand (although, perhaps not totally impossible if operating with the left hand), opening doors with a hand would tend to the usual sort of operator acting.

Oh wow, I thought it'd be much heavier. I'm starting to think it could workable to go steadicam, at least it'll take out some of the shakes and knobs, I don't want it to be overly still but there's a very ethereal look with a motionless steadicam.
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#6 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 15 February 2012 - 10:06 AM

Just checking. they used a Panaglide on Halloween... Panavision's rip off at the time (It ended up in court if I remember correctly). The one handed operation gives a more floaty feel during the camera moves.
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