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advice on how to light a rear projection


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#1 dora benko

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Posted 16 February 2012 - 08:22 PM

hallo hallo

anyone could advise me how to light a rear projection in a studio?and what type of light to use? HMI would work with gels?
i will use beta, aiming for a reddish dirty look. it does not meant to look professional!

also if you have any advice on how to set up rear projection as i never done it before, i would appreciate it! maybe some one know some secret tricks how to do it in a small studio!

thank you thank you

dora
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#2 Adam Brown

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 02:40 AM

It's going to depend a lot on the specs of the projector and what kind of light output it can produce. What type of setting is it? Is it supposed to be like a theater, or is it abstract? Because, if you're setting it up to resemble something where the projected image quality is very important, then the material you choose to project on is pretty crucial. There are all sorts of rear-projection screens available. You'll want to look for something that will reflect the vibrancy of the light and not soak up all your colors. For example, I did an installation in a gallery once using a Rosco rear projection material that was specially designed to make colors pop accurately and give a wide angle of view. It was pretty costly. If that projection quality is not as relevant, then you could always use something as cheap and accessible as thin, white bed sheet. Keep in mind that sharpness of the projection deteriorates significantly, as does the color saturation and brightness of your overall image.

Another thing you'll greatly want to consider when lighting your subject is to flag off your lights from spilling onto the projection material. You'll want to keep that part of the set as dark as possible, because you'll need every bit of contrast you can get. And, any spill from your lights on the screen is only going to negatively affect that.

As far as the choice of light goes, I don't think it matters specifically, as long as your choice works within the context of your scene. You do want to make sure that your lights, either with or without gels, match the color temperature of your projection for white balance purposes, so that both the projected elements and the subject the you're shooting have accurate color.

Hope this helps!
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#3 dora benko

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 07:25 AM

yeah, it is a no budget film, so we will have to make up something "homemade". this is the available projector, NEC LT156 3LCD Projector. Do you reckon that it would work?
or would you think to use something else?
the image quality meant to be quite dirty, grainy, almost out of focus so the quality might not be the issue, but the colour temperature?

thanks for your answer, i really appreciate it!
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Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

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Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

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