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35mm HD 2K 4K Scan Pros and Cons


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#1 Dylan de Mott

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Posted 17 February 2012 - 10:26 PM

Hello,

I'm a student, and I am looking to shoot my thesis on 35mm. I have plenty of experience digital, and I've worked 16mm before. I have not shot 35mm yet, and so I have some questions about Telecine. The quotes I'm getting from the post house, ie. Cinelicious, Deluxe, Technicolor; they are always asking me whether I'm doing an HD or SD scan. I've not yet been asked about 2K or 4K.

So, my question is: If I shoot 35mm, and I do the post, or scan or DI or Telecine, whatever the proper name for it is, in HD what are the pros and cons aside from price? 2K pros and cons aside from price? 4K pros and cons aside from price?

Thank you.
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#2 Paul Bartok

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 03:47 PM

Do you need a 4k scan or even a 2k scan the only advantage is resolution, but why would you need that for a student thesis unless your already planning on doing pan and scans.

4k is only used for FX work atm.
Could your workflow even handle a 4k project most Films today finish at a 2k raster soon 4k.

Most projections are at 2k tops at the moment and 2k is only 18% bigger than HD. You will save heaps of money by not doing it, and besides it's film you can always re scan it later to 4k if its successful or needed to be.

Just get a 12 Bit HD scan.
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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 18 February 2012 - 09:12 PM

Exactly what Paul Said.
I normally opt for a 1080p ProRes 4444 or 422 scan, depending on the job; be it originated on 35 or 16mm. When and if the show is ever picked up for something big, and 2K is needed, you can always go back and re-scan, but that's a bigger cost that honestly, you don't normally need unless you're going theatrical. Hell, I'd say most films wind up on DVD anyway, and/or BluRay, as such 1080P master is just fine.
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#4 Dylan de Mott

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Posted 19 February 2012 - 09:51 PM

Exactly what Paul Said.
I normally opt for a 1080p ProRes 4444 or 422 scan, depending on the job; be it originated on 35 or 16mm. When and if the show is ever picked up for something big, and 2K is needed, you can always go back and re-scan, but that's a bigger cost that honestly, you don't normally need unless you're going theatrical. Hell, I'd say most films wind up on DVD anyway, and/or BluRay, as such 1080P master is just fine.


Thank you both so much. I greatly appreciate the feedback. I have to admit its nice to have a place where someone learning can feel safe asking questions. Sometimes students get such an attitude for asking questions. Thank you. I'm doing an HD scan, we are shooting Fuji with Cooke primes and angenieux zooms.

Cheers.
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