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2000 fps is considered revolutionary?


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#1 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 07:04 AM

I was watching the 84th Academy Awards and took great interest in the section on technical achievements. It was noted that with digital high speed cameras, 2000fps was now possible. I was under the impression that for decades, there have been high speed film cameras that could run at more than double that frame rate. Am I missing something here?
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#2 Jock Blakley

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 08:06 AM

Yeah, you're missing the fact that everything that was ever achievable with film never happened.
Geez, get with the program.

;)
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#3 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 08:29 AM

Yeah, you're missing the fact that everything that was ever achievable with film never happened.
Geez, get with the program.


I don't know what's confusing me more from that awards night - the 2000 fps statement or Angelina Jolie's exaggerated leg pose :huh: .
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#4 Mark Dunn

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 08:51 AM

High-speed up to 20,000pps was always fairly straightforward with 16mm, and much higher with more specialised techniques where the film didn't have to move at all- up to millions of pps equivalent.
But the limit for 35mm. was always a lot lower- a couple of thousand pps and a few hundred pin-registered. 1000' in a few seconds.

(PPS, 'pictures per second', accounts for using a half-height frame with the appropriate rotating prism to get a higher effective framing rate. So the film only has to move at half the speed.)
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#5 Marcus Joseph

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 10:18 AM

Yeah that actually took me a bit by surprise too, I mean of course film stock gets ridiculously chewed up, but that kind of slow motion has been possible with film for a while. The digital equivalents are getting pretty interesting though.
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#6 Mark Dunn

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 10:29 AM

film stock gets ridiculously chewed up,

We used tweezers, paintbrush and a vacuum cleaner to clean up after each run.
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#7 Tom Jensen

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 12:20 PM

We used tweezers, paintbrush and a vacuum cleaner to clean up after each run.


We called it "making salad." The statement at the awards should not be so difficult to understand. The achievement was in digital photography which is or will be the new standard.
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