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After a cable that resembles a VGA type


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#1 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 11:51 AM

I'm looking around for a cable that closely resembles a VGA computer monitor cable except that it has two rows of pins - four pins below and five pins on top. You can see the socket (for this cable) on stand-alone copy cameras like the Sony DXC-950 etc. Just wondering what these type of cables are called? With the camera controls, you can configure this cable to output a variety of different video signals like Y/C etc. If I was going to go with the Y/C option, then I would need a cable with the VGA-lookalike thing on one end and an Svideo socket on the other end.
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 12:48 PM

Could you post a photo of the connector in question?
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#3 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 02:11 PM

Could you post a photo of the connector in question?


Yea, here's an ebay auction for a DXC-950. One of the photos shows the back of the camera which features the socket which is labelled 'RGB/Sync.'

http://www.ebay.com/...=item2c638b2218

Edited by Patrick Cooper, 04 March 2012 - 02:12 PM.

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#4 Freya Black

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 03:28 PM

Well the squarish one would be called a 9 pin d connector. It's a very common connector as it used to be used on computers for the serial cable. You may find old pc mice that have them before they started having ps2 sockets loooooong ago. ;)

love

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#5 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 11:32 PM

Well the squarish one would be called a 9 pin d connector. It's a very common connector as it used to be used on computers for the serial cable. You may find old pc mice that have them before they started having ps2 sockets loooooong ago. ;)


The tricky thing would be to find a 9 pin d to svideo cable. Ive been searching online and they appear to be extremely rare. I have found photos of a cable that has a 9 pin d socket and an svideo socket but they are both on one end of the cable - not opposite ends.

By the way, I'm also curious about the 'video out' connector (also shown) which I guess is a BNC type which outputs composite video. However, the pin looks extremely thin. The pins (as well as holes) normally utilised in RCA composite set ups (red, white, yellow etc) are generally thicker, or I should say stubbier.

Edited by Patrick Cooper, 04 March 2012 - 11:36 PM.

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#6 Patrick Nuse

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 01:48 AM

I'm looking around for a cable that closely resembles a VGA computer monitor cable except that it has two rows of pins - four pins below and five pins on top. You can see the socket (for this cable) on stand-alone copy cameras like the Sony DXC-950 etc. Just wondering what these type of cables are called? With the camera controls, you can configure this cable to output a variety of different video signals like Y/C etc. If I was going to go with the Y/C option, then I would need a cable with the VGA-lookalike thing on one end and an Svideo socket on the other end.


You need a circuit to convert RGB/Sync to composite or Y/C. Specifically a video encoder. If you really need to do it blackmagic may have a converter that does this.
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#7 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 02:22 AM

You need a circuit to convert RGB/Sync to composite or Y/C. Specifically a video encoder. If you really need to do it blackmagic may have a converter that does this.


I was under the impression that the camera (DXC-950) had the ability to do this conversion. It's been a long time since Ive seen the manual but I though I recall that you could choose from different video output options when using the RGB/Sync connector - from a menu system or something like that.
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#8 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 02:30 AM

Here's a quote from a PDF article:

"In addition to a BNC connector providing a composite signal
output, the DXC-950 has a 9-pin D-sub output connector for
component and RGB signals. A Y/C or VBS signal is also
available from the 9-pin D-sub connector simultaneously, and is
selected by the function menu control buttons on the camera
rear panel or with the optional RM-C950 Remote Control Unit."
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#9 Freya Black

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 05:13 AM

The tricky thing would be to find a 9 pin d to svideo cable. Ive been searching online and they appear to be extremely rare. I have found photos of a cable that has a 9 pin d socket and an svideo socket but they are both on one end of the cable - not opposite ends.


Yes, that would be tricky! I had in my mind that you were going to get the connectors and get out the old soldering iron! ;)

It's not as simple as just having the right connectors at each end either. The wire in between needs to be connected the right way too!

By the way, I'm also curious about the 'video out' connector (also shown) which I guess is a BNC type which outputs composite video. However, the pin looks extremely thin. The pins (as well as holes) normally utilised in RCA composite set ups (red, white, yellow etc) are generally thicker, or I should say stubbier.


Well yes, because they are different kinds of connectors. You can get a BNC to RCA adaptor very easily but you can't just plug RCA cables into a bnc connector without one. BTW bnc is very common for composite connections outside of the consumer home video market. There it would be BNC that is the normal conection.

love

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#10 Daniel Smith

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 09:02 AM

9-pin D-type or D-subminature, often used to carry control signals like RS-232 or RS-422. (RS = Recommended Standard).
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#11 Daniel Smith

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 09:12 AM

By the way, I'm also curious about the 'video out' connector (also shown) which I guess is a BNC type which outputs composite video. However, the pin looks extremely thin. The pins (as well as holes) normally utilised in RCA composite set ups (red, white, yellow etc) are generally thicker, or I should say stubbier.

The BNC connector is used in any professional production environment, it's bayonet locking means unlike RCA consumer connectors, it doesn't pull or fall out. Don't worry about the size of the centre pin, it's tough, and makes RCA connectors look soft as cheese.

Does it come with the CCU, or do you have one?
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#12 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 01:35 PM

Does it come with the CCU, or do you have one?


I just got the camera body, no lens or any other accessories. As such, I have no idea if I have a working camera or not...at least not yet.
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#13 Daniel Smith

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Posted 05 March 2012 - 04:06 PM

I just got the camera body, no lens or any other accessories. As such, I have no idea if I have a working camera or not...at least not yet.

If you can get a BNC to phono (RCA) adapter you should be able to test to see if you're at least getting an output, they're fairly common, and 'video out' tends to denote an analogue PAL or NTSC composite signal output - which all consumer televisions with a phono connection should accept.

Don't worry too much about the CCU, it's just that some lenses/cameras require control from an RCP or OCP (Remote/Operational Control Panel) via the CCU - but if you can control everything you need to on the camera itself (and the lens when you get it) then there's no problem.
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#14 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 06 March 2012 - 09:01 AM

Don't worry too much about the CCU, it's just that some lenses/cameras require control from an RCP or OCP (Remote/Operational Control Panel) via the CCU - but if you can control everything you need to on the camera itself (and the lens when you get it) then there's no problem.


Exactly. Though I do need power! I'm wondering if there's an electronics store than can build me a power supply that can plug into the mains.
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