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Gel Windows


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#1 Joe Perri

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 04:23 PM

Hey all,

So i work on this reality show and every so often we shoot at a location that requires us to ND windows. Its usually a pain in the but process to properly cut the gels to the size of the window and figure out how they are going to stick even in high winds. We usually wind up gaff or paper taping the gels to the windows. i personally find taping the gels rather cumbersome and was wondering if there is a more proper and efficient approach to gelling windows. Any advice would be much appreciated. Thanks!
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#2 Frank Glencairn

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Posted 11 March 2012 - 04:49 PM

Has anyone tried adhesive foil?
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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 12 March 2012 - 05:42 AM

squeegee and flat sprite.
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#4 Matthew Rogers

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Posted 14 March 2012 - 07:12 AM

For some reason I was under the impression you could also use water with a couple of drops of soap in it (soap helps with the surface tension.)

Does anyone know how well flat, clear soda sticks gel? Would it be strong enough to keep gel on a car that's on a process trailer? And are there anythings to worry about if the gel is close (like a side car window) to an actor's face...such as imperfections in the gel, how well you applied it, residue from the soda, etc.

Edited by Matthew Rogers, 14 March 2012 - 07:13 AM.

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#5 Tad Howard

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 09:28 PM

For cars, automotive window film works best. It has a built in adhesive. I have used a 50% mixture of sprite and water to stick ND to windows. Matthew is half right, a spray bottle with a soap mixture will allow a squeegie to slide along the outside of the film without pulling it out of place. So you use the sprite mixture between the film and the glass and the soap on the outside of the film. It's a tedious process, but works. Having proper tools and clean hands and moments laid out in advance in the schedule are key. Good luck
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#6 robert duke

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 01:10 AM

For cars, automotive window film works best. It has a built in adhesive. I have used a 50% mixture of sprite and water to stick ND to windows. Matthew is half right, a spray bottle with a soap mixture will allow a squeegie to slide along the outside of the film without pulling it out of place. So you use the sprite mixture between the film and the glass and the soap on the outside of the film. It's a tedious process, but works. Having proper tools and clean hands and moments laid out in advance in the schedule are key. Good luck

just not the interior of a bus window. ;) BTW chuck says hi.
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#7 Tad Howard

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Posted 16 March 2012 - 09:06 AM

Duke, Compound curves on glass with flat ND is a super pain! Heat gun and automotive film is the best bet! How many rolls did we go through on that show? Then Uncle D. called me in to do more on "Tough Trade". Tell Chuck to "Go Big!"
xoxoxo to your gurlz!
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#8 Bryan Fowler

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Posted 23 March 2012 - 08:27 AM

Back when I tinted windows for money, heating and curving film was a pain. And took a while.

Sometimes we took the window out, if it was easy. (Jeep cherokee)

Other times we...
brb doorbell.
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