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#1 Chai Rolfe

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Posted 22 March 2012 - 06:41 AM

Hi,

I'm on the last leg for my dissertation and thought I might as well try my luck at getting some unique insights into the subject. The title is:

To what extent can it be argued that the cinematographers of the early Golden Age of Hollywood were the 'real cinematographers' of film history, and that due to the absence of technological interference from digital technology such as Digital Intermediates, they commanded more control over the image?

My question for anyone that is willing to give an insight on the subject is: On a purely technical level, what would you change about the Digital Intermediate process to retain more control over the image?

Thanks for reading this far. Any comments at all would be greatly appreciated. (And don't worry, you're not writing my dissertation, I'm already at my word limit but just feel some of the quotes I've incorporated are too similar)
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 08:37 AM

Hi,

I'm on the last leg for my dissertation and thought I might as well try my luck at getting some unique insights into the subject. The title is:

To what extent can it be argued that the cinematographers of the early Golden Age of Hollywood were the 'real cinematographers' of film history, and that due to the absence of technological interference from digital technology such as Digital Intermediates, they commanded more control over the image?

My question for anyone that is willing to give an insight on the subject is: On a purely technical level, what would you change about the Digital Intermediate process to retain more control over the image?

Thanks for reading this far. Any comments at all would be greatly appreciated. (And don't worry, you're not writing my dissertation, I'm already at my word limit but just feel some of the quotes I've incorporated are too similar)


This isn't a technical issue, mainly a contractual issue. Cinematographers need to be considered as important to the color-correction process as the colorist is, and need to be paid to supervise it. Beyond that, the ability of people in power over the cinematographer to screw up the image has always existed and technology isn't going to fix that.
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#3 Richard Boddington

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Posted 24 March 2012 - 10:25 AM

the ability of people in power over the cinematographer to screw up the image has always existed and technology isn't going to fix that.


I'd like more blue.

R,
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#4 Bruce Greene

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Posted 25 March 2012 - 01:33 PM

Hi,

I'm on the last leg for my dissertation and thought I might as well try my luck at getting some unique insights into the subject. The title is:

To what extent can it be argued that the cinematographers of the early Golden Age of Hollywood were the 'real cinematographers' of film history, and that due to the absence of technological interference from digital technology such as Digital Intermediates, they commanded more control over the image?

My question for anyone that is willing to give an insight on the subject is: On a purely technical level, what would you change about the Digital Intermediate process to retain more control over the image?

Thanks for reading this far. Any comments at all would be greatly appreciated. (And don't worry, you're not writing my dissertation, I'm already at my word limit but just feel some of the quotes I've incorporated are too similar)


Interesting question.

On my last few projects, there hasn't been the budget for 1st class DI, so I've learned to do the grading myself, with the tutelage of a very good colorist. In this way I've been able to retain control over the image, and get paid at the same time. I'm not sure I'd do it again, if we can employ a great colorist, but my understanding of the process and camera characteristics has improved tremendously.
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Opal

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

CineLab

Metropolis Post

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam