Jump to content


Photo

Colour temperature


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Baburam

Baburam
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Kathmandu, Nepal

Posted 29 March 2012 - 10:38 AM

Is it true that we can shoot in RED (without setting colour temperature) no worry about colour temperature?
  • 0

#2 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 29 March 2012 - 10:45 AM

No.

It is true that you can "change" the color temperature later on. However, the sensor has a native balance of about 5500K- daylight. By changing it, either in camera or in post, you are simply increasing or decreasing gain on the color channels-- though "in camera change" is a bit odd as it's really just meta-data at that point. For best results, it is suggested that you shoot @ 5600K with 5600K lighting, says me. (This is truest on the older "M" Chips, but also carries over to the MX line IMHO).
  • 0

#3 Hugo Miro

Hugo Miro
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 12 posts
  • Student

Posted 29 March 2012 - 01:09 PM

However, the sensor has a native balance of about 5500K- daylight


What about the Alexa?
  • 0

#4 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7118 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 29 March 2012 - 01:11 PM

Same. All silicon based sensors, as far as I know, are biased towards a daylight balance. White balancing any of them just changes the gains, though I'm not 100% on what "daylight" the Alexa is by default, but I'd suspect 5400~5800K with 5600K being the most likely.
  • 0

#5 Baburam

Baburam
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Kathmandu, Nepal

Posted 01 April 2012 - 09:17 AM

No.

It is true that you can "change" the color temperature later on. However, the sensor has a native balance of about 5500K- daylight. By changing it, either in camera or in post, you are simply increasing or decreasing gain on the color channels-- though "in camera change" is a bit odd as it's really just meta-data at that point. For best results, it is suggested that you shoot @ 5600K with 5600K lighting, says me. (This is truest on the older "M" Chips, but also carries over to the MX line IMHO).

Thanks a lot.
  • 0

#6 Victor Lazaro

Victor Lazaro
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 10 posts
  • Camera Operator

Posted 23 June 2012 - 08:07 PM

Which bring us to the next question:

Would you rather change the CT in in the settings (wether on camera or in post), or use CT filters?
  • 0

#7 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19765 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 23 June 2012 - 08:20 PM

Depends on how noisy the blue channel gets at the lower color temp settings. For the average dialogue scene, the noise level is fine at standard ISO at 3200K settings on cameras like the Alexa, F65, Epic, etc. I was fine with it even on the MX Red One. For blue screen work, you may want a cleaner blue channel so working closer to 5600K would help.
  • 0


Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Visual Products

Aerial Filmworks

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

CineLab

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

Abel Cine

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

Rig Wheels Passport