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Loading 400' 16mm?


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#1 John Mackey

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 04:49 PM

Is it possible to load a 400 foot roll of 16mm film into a mag in a darkroom rather than a changing bag?
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#2 Bernie O'Doherty

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 05:24 PM

Yes John, only difference is when you're in the darkroom, it's like you're in a giant changing bag with the mag and film.
There's a movie idea there somewhere......

Cheers, Bernie
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#3 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 06:17 PM

Yes John, only difference is when you're in the darkroom, it's like you're in a giant changing bag with the mag and film.

Also your hands are less likly to get sweaty, you can scratch an Itchy nose, and you can arrange things on the table. Disadvantage is that if you drop something it can roll away and be hard to find.
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#4 Chris Millar

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 07:40 PM

...and while you're on the ground searching for the dropped spool you notice the dirty big light leaks around the doorframe, from the sink plug hole and through the light fittings in the ceiling :D

Sometimes if you're lucky you'll hear that 'swish-swish' sound of a spool unwinding into a gazzilion twists on the floor.


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#5 John Mackey

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 08:36 PM

Thanks. I have a room that I can turn into a dark room. Is there a certain type of safelight I should use?
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#6 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 09:07 PM

Thanks. I have a room that I can turn into a dark room. Is there a certain type of safelight I should use?

The cheapest one TOTAL DARKNESS.

Sit in your room with all the lights turned off, if you can't see ANYTHING after 10 minutes it is probably dark enough.
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#7 Chris Millar

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Posted 04 April 2012 - 11:38 PM

Safelights only work on printing papers - I recall discussion regarding nightvision goggles - but seriously, join the club and do it in the dark...

And the 10minute thing is true, if your eyes aren't adjusted then they just wont see spills that become abundantly clear once you've opened the can (and can now see the Kodak logo).
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#8 Tom Jensen

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 01:40 AM

No, how are you going to see anything? :blink:
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#9 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 10:32 AM

No, how are you going to see anything? :blink:

you don't. Perhaps that is why film makers have good imaginations :)

And the advantage of the darkroom, you can organize your table or bench with what you want to work on, and select objects by feel. Empty cans on the left, Magazines in the middle, exposed film on the right, ends under the bench. or whatever system works for you.
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#10 Charlie Peich

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 10:53 AM

No, how are you going to see anything? :blink:


When loading /unloading in a changing bag, does one close their eyes to help imagine being in a dark room feeling your way around, or does one keep their eyes open
to take in the surrounding scenery and engage in conversations with your fellow crew members? Posted Image
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#11 Tom Jensen

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Posted 05 April 2012 - 12:33 PM

I've used a darkroom once or twice.

you don't. Perhaps that is why film makers have good imaginations :)

And the advantage of the darkroom, you can organize your table or bench with what you want to work on, and select objects by feel. Empty cans on the left, Magazines in the middle, exposed film on the right, ends under the bench. or whatever system works for you.


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#12 John Mackey

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 08:48 PM

Another question: I am confused about the loading of a 400' mag on the Eclair NPR. I know that it has to be done in total darkness, but the manual says that that only applies to the 'film feed' side. Does that mean that once I load that side of the magazine and close it, I can turn the lights on to finish loading the film in the takeup side?
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#13 Chris Millar

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 10:20 PM

Another question: I am confused about the loading of a 400' mag on the Eclair NPR. I know that it has to be done in total darkness, but the manual says that that only applies to the 'film feed' side. Does that mean that once I load that side of the magazine and close it, I can turn the lights on to finish loading the film in the takeup side?



Well, yeh!

The film used to start the head on the take up spool isn't going to be exposed with anything meaningful (focused light from a lens for instance) - you're not gaining anything by keeping it in the dark.


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