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How did Spielberg/Kaminski create the look they used in Indy 4?


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#1 Matthew Kakaris

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 11:04 PM

What I'm talking about can really be seen during after the diner scene, watch the reflections of lights on chrome parts of cars and such. This looks sort of makes everything shiny. Is it caused by a filter? a film stock? enLIGHTen me please...
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 06 April 2012 - 11:46 PM

Some scenes used a Schneider Classic Soft diffusion and some others used a net.
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#3 Matthew Kakaris

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 06:01 PM

Some scenes used a Schneider Classic Soft diffusion and some others used a net.


What exactly is a net? Pardon my ignorance here.
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#4 Ari Davidson

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 06:20 PM

What exactly is a net? Pardon my ignorance here.


A piece of a stocking (yup, like for women's legs), stretched and mounted on the rear element of a lens. Other practices also include mounting on an optical flat or filter stage in front of the lens. On my first shoot with the Sony F3 the AC's used double sided tape and stuck it right on the camera, just in front of the sensor. It looked great! I first tried it on my Pentax P30, and really let me know how to work with it by the time I had to use various shades and weaves in production. If you want the best results, stretch the F%#! out of it!
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#5 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 10:52 PM

In Kaminski's case, however, the net is stretched and glued down to a filter frame and used in front of the lens. He used nets behind the lens for some scenes in "Amistad" but I heard that uses them in front now.

I use a light net on a frame now and then, it's faster than peeling nets off of the rear element and gluing them back on, back & forth.
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#6 George Ebersole

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Posted 07 April 2012 - 11:54 PM

What exactly is a net? Pardon my ignorance here.

The nets we used to use were essentially cloth versions of scrims for lights (usually a Mole Richardson). They were even color coded like scrims; i.e. red and green for double and single strength. You propped them up on a C-stand just like a flag.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 09:34 AM

Lighting nets are different than net diffusion over a lens or behind it. Scrims and nets in front of lights are not supposed to soften the light but net filters for cameras do soften the image ( and I suppose looking through a scrim would also soften the view...)
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#8 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 09:40 AM

Here's a photo of a homemade 4x5 net filter:
Posted Image
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#9 Matthew Kakaris

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 04:25 PM

Thanks Everyone! This was really helpful!
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#10 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 05:01 PM

I have some examples of nets vs. Classic Soft (glass) filters from "War of the Worlds":

Nets:
Posted Image

Posted Image

Classic Softs (I picked fairly extreme examples in the movie when the effect was most visible):
Posted Image

Posted Image
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#11 Matthew Kakaris

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 07:40 PM

Wow, Thanks. One can really see the difference between the two methods.
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#12 George Ebersole

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Posted 08 April 2012 - 10:37 PM

Lighting nets are different than net diffusion over a lens or behind it. Scrims and nets in front of lights are not supposed to soften the light but net filters for cameras do soften the image ( and I suppose looking through a scrim would also soften the view...)

I had a feeling that was it. Oh well.
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#13 Keith Walters

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 08:57 PM

Just a warning:
Rental companies occasionally get lens sets back where the hirer has applied net to the rear elements using Cyanoacrylate glue (SuperGlue). They typically put a ring of glue around the metal perimeter and then stretch a piece of stocking over it until the glue sets. I don't know why, but a lot of people seem think it's normal practice to send lenses back with the net still attached. If it's a back-to-back rental situation and the Prep dept has to spend hours cleaning the glue off, they will not be amused.
And if you get any of the glue on the rear element you will likely be facing a maximum insurance excess payment, or possibly an even larger bill if you completely ruin the lens and your insurance does not include imbecile crew cover :rolleyes: .
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#14 George Ebersole

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Posted 09 April 2012 - 10:20 PM

Just a warning:
Rental companies occasionally get lens sets back where the hirer has applied net to the rear elements using Cyanoacrylate glue (SuperGlue). They typically put a ring of glue around the metal perimeter and then stretch a piece of stocking over it until the glue sets. I don't know why, but a lot of people seem think it's normal practice to send lenses back with the net still attached. If it's a back-to-back rental situation and the Prep dept has to spend hours cleaning the glue off, they will not be amused.
And if you get any of the glue on the rear element you will likely be facing a maximum insurance excess payment, or possibly an even larger bill if you completely ruin the lens and your insurance does not include imbecile crew cover :rolleyes: .

But why on Earth would you glue anything to a rented camera package?
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