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Shooting Double X 7222 in low light?


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#1 John Mackey

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 07:52 PM

I'm about to shoot a short 16mm film. Most of it takes place at night, both interiors and exteriors. I have a scene in the afternoon, and then one scene in the early morning just as the sun comes up. I'd appreciate any advice using Eastman Double X 7222. I have a very low budget, and I also don't mind some grain. I've read that this stock pushed looks good, despite a little more grain. should I set my light meter for 400 ISO instead of 200? Or expose it at 200 like the label on the can says?

For my night exteriors, there are streetlights, but how much more light would I need to add. I'd like to use CFLs in Chinese Lanterns. As for night interiors, also want to use CFLs in either chinese lanterns or table lamps. Should I expose it at 200 or 400?

Same question for early morning.

My lens at its fastest is f/2.2 But I'd hope to use it at 4 or even 5.6
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#2 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 09:04 PM

Are all your Compact Florescent lamps equipped with a high frequency ballast?
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#3 John Mackey

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 09:09 AM

Are all your Compact Florescent lamps equipped with a high frequency ballast?


I'm not sure. I am buying ones from Home Depot that are the screw ins for desk lamps; for example a 23-watt (100w equivalent) compact fluorescent bulb. Is that different than CFL? I'm looking at the tech specs on the home depot website. It doesn't say whether or not there is high frequency ballast
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#4 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 14 April 2012 - 03:07 PM

I always worry about fluorescents causing flicker with the interaction of the flashing that they do in combination with the shutter. Some of the CFL bulbs have a ballast that flashes them fast enough to avoid the problem.
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#5 Will Montgomery

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Posted 26 April 2012 - 09:16 AM

Double X is a great, grainy stock. Very cool look for what it sounds like you're doing.

Always go for more light. Whatever you have in mind, double it; inside and out. Assuming you are transferring and editing digitally, you want the colorist to have more light to work with. Double X is already grainy, if you don't give it enough light it will be too grainy.

Here's a quick test in 35mm on an Eyemo just natural light...



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