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Kodak Double X 7222 advice?


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#1 TW Foley

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Posted 15 April 2012 - 03:56 PM

How do you get the most out of Double X 7222 16mm? I know it is rated at 200T/250D, but if shooting night interiors, lighting with CFLs in table and desk lamps on screen, should this stock be rated at 200? Or would it be better to rate it at 250, 320, or even 400 and have the lab push process it? I don't mind grain, but some nice contrast would be good.

I know it really depends on the type of look I want, but I'd like to know what each ISO setting on my light meter would result in.
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#2 zerzour r

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Posted 22 April 2012 - 10:14 PM

Hi Guys,

Just to let you know that EASTMAN KODAK 16mm x122m (400ft) DOUBLE-X N/B (Black & White) Negative 7222 for 29.99 euros .
If interested here is the direct to the ebayer
http://cgi.ebay.fr/E...=item35bb8403e1

Enjoy
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#3 Will Montgomery

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 08:58 AM

Assuming you'll be transferring and not printing, always err on MORE LIGHT. Double X is a very grainy stock, one of the things I love about it. But remember it was designed at a time before modern negative stocks where it was expected you'd have plenty of light on your sound stage. Just crank up the light and expose at 200. Otherwise you'll get an experimental look with crazy grain. You can sit with the colorist and achieve whatever look you need at transfer.

Keep in mind when I say crank up the light that does't mean ignore where and how you place them...that's critically important, just plan on having more than you might expect.
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#4 Chris Burke

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 02:39 PM

Will couldn't have put it better. If you look at the beginning of Casino Royale or Memento, you get modern examples of how good it can look. Granted those film were shot on 35, but you can get the same contrast. It is a finicky stock, so you basically have to nail it. What I have done is when I wanted a lot of contrast, is meter for the highlights and add light to the shadows as needed. If I wanted flatter contrast, I would fill in the shadows even more. I would keep it at 200, that half stop either way pretty much where you want to be. I am curious what folks experience has been with this stock outdoors on a sunny day. What filters have people used to get what effect? In particular a polarizer. I know that with a circular polarizer you loose about 2 2/3 stops of light, but is a linear polarizer the same?
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Wooden Camera

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CineLab

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

FJS International, LLC

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc