Jump to content


Photo

Storage


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 Brent Stevenson

Brent Stevenson

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Student

Posted 26 April 2012 - 08:56 AM

Should I keep my unused 16mm film in the fridge?
  • 0

#2 Will Montgomery

Will Montgomery
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2030 posts
  • Producer
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 26 April 2012 - 09:09 AM

Yes.

Or at the bottom of a mine to avoid cosmic rays. (seriously.)
  • 0

#3 Phil Soheili

Phil Soheili
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 45 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Milan, Italy

Posted 26 April 2012 - 09:55 AM

Yes, at the bottom of mine..
Sorry, just had to..

But seriously, I have mine in the freezer (-15 Celsius)
  • 0

#4 Brent Stevenson

Brent Stevenson

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Student

Posted 26 April 2012 - 04:32 PM

Thought so, just wanted confirmation. Thanks
So freezer better than fridge? Film wont freeze? (probably stupid question, newbie here)
  • 0

#5 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7115 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 26 April 2012 - 04:53 PM

Freezer for longer term. Normally over 6 months or so. Also make sure the film cans weren't opened else you can get ice crystals. The point is to slow down the chemical reactions the film undergoes naturally "fogging up," essentially building up a small level of exposure over time, making blacks muddy and not really black (and effecting film speed).

it's always best to use the freshest stock possible, of course, but nothing wrong with squirreling some extra away you have had for later use. Also keep in mind, the faster the film, the more crucial it is that it is stored properly. I almost always keep 500T in the freezer, as well as 250 T or D, 200 and under I keep it in my fridge. Next to the beer.
  • 1

#6 Brent Stevenson

Brent Stevenson

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Student

Posted 26 April 2012 - 07:43 PM

Cheers, I'm well versed in the storage of beer.
  • 0

#7 Matej Pok

Matej Pok
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 69 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Bratislava, Slovak Republic, Europe

Posted 12 May 2012 - 05:11 AM

Hi guys,

From my knowledge, unexposed stock can be stored in freezer below -180C for ANY length of time. That's what I've been told on film school by professors. It's because every chemical processes are so slowed, that you can assume, they've already stopped. And once taken out, stock can be used as fresh one.

Personally, I store every unexposed stock (both fresh and recans) in freezer, then when I want to use it, I move it to fridge for about a day (12 hours are enough ;) )
Exposed stock I store in fridge, till I can get it developed. Sometime it's been a while (like a month) and I can't see really a difference (in HD telecine).

That's my workflow and I've never had any problems :rolleyes:
  • 1

#8 Charles MacDonald

Charles MacDonald
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1157 posts
  • Other
  • Stittsville Ontario Canada

Posted 12 May 2012 - 06:39 PM

Hi guys,

From my knowledge, unexposed stock can be stored in freezer below -180C for ANY length of time.


I have a couple of hundred feet of 5222 that I loaded into still cassettes back when it was new around 1986. It how develops with Very grey edges, and and needs a higher contrast Mulltigrade filter to print. (an option that is not available for movies)

The higher speed the film, the more it fogs even in the freezer. For caparison I finished off a few rolls of Plus-x still film from the same era two yaers ago, and it was fine. The roll of 4X loaded at the same time I found was not printable.
  • 0

#9 Kane George Jason

Kane George Jason
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 42 posts
  • Director
  • Western Australia

Posted 27 May 2013 - 01:50 AM

As Fuji stocks are running thin - does anyone know how true this statement is?

 

From my knowledge, unexposed stock can be stored in freezer below -180C for ANY length of time.

 

I'm thinking of getting more stock for a future project (perhaps 2-3 years from now).

 

What's everyone's opinion on long term storage?


  • 0

#10 Will Montgomery

Will Montgomery
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2030 posts
  • Producer
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 29 May 2013 - 11:29 AM

The higher speed the film, the more it fogs even in the freezer. For caparison I finished off a few rolls of Plus-x still film from the same era two yaers ago, and it was fine. The roll of 4X loaded at the same time I found was not printable.

If that the freezer/refrigerator's fault or simply the nature of higher speed film? Are you saying that freezing accelerated the process or could it have an extended a relatively short life anyway?

 

Here's another question, does film stored in a freezer/refrigerator put out any harmful chemicals into the air that would be bad for any food also stored there? In other words, do I need a completely separate fridge for film? Don't want to poison anyone...


  • 0

#11 Will Montgomery

Will Montgomery
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2030 posts
  • Producer
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 29 May 2013 - 11:31 AM

What's everyone's opinion on long term storage?

No problem for slower speed films like 100T or 50D. Faster speed films (especially 500T) I always try to buy as fresh as possible for each project.


  • 0

#12 Kane George Jason

Kane George Jason
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 42 posts
  • Director
  • Western Australia

Posted 29 May 2013 - 12:35 PM

Thanks Will!

 

I was looking at either 64D or 160T... Do you think the 160T would be fine for a few years?

 

In it's own freezer of course :-)

 

Hopefully my dozen 500T's for my current project (shooting in 6 months) will last in the freezer...


  • 0

#13 Mark Dunn

Mark Dunn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 2420 posts
  • Other
  • London

Posted 29 May 2013 - 01:48 PM

 

Here's another question, does film stored in a freezer/refrigerator put out any harmful chemicals into the air that would be bad for any food also stored there? In other words, do I need a completely separate fridge for film? Don't want to poison anyone...

No. Even so it ought to be in taped cans (and a bag to protect it from beer accidents and bleeding steaks).


  • 0

#14 Will Montgomery

Will Montgomery
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2030 posts
  • Producer
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 29 May 2013 - 02:51 PM

No. Even so it ought to be in taped cans (and a bag to protect it from beer accidents and bleeding steaks).

A little blood on the can is nothing new.  :)


  • 0

#15 David Cunningham

David Cunningham
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1049 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 29 May 2013 - 02:52 PM

No. Even so it ought to be in taped cans (and a bag to protect it from beer accidents and bleeding steaks).

No alcohol abuse!  And certainly no abusing film with alcohol!  Double abuse!


  • 0

#16 Rudy Velez Jr

Rudy Velez Jr
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 216 posts
  • Other
  • New York

Posted 30 May 2013 - 03:55 AM

What about camera storage? Lenses? Is there a certain temperature a camera is supposed to be stored at. Summer is coming  and I was curious with regards to camera storage.


  • 0

#17 Kane George Jason

Kane George Jason
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 42 posts
  • Director
  • Western Australia

Posted 30 May 2013 - 05:06 AM

@Rudy: keeping it locked up in its box under a hot tin roof probably isn't your safest bet! If it lives in a dry/cool place - it should survive.


  • 0

#18 Will Montgomery

Will Montgomery
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2030 posts
  • Producer
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 30 May 2013 - 11:09 AM

Just had Visual Products work over my S16 SR2 that had lived in India for a few years. Most of the screws were rusted. They replaced all the screws and gave it a little love bringing it back to fighting shape. So moist conditions are not good for film cameras but regular maintenance can help fix that.

 

If you are talking long term storage, watch out for foam cases as they tend to disintegrate over the years. Maybe put the equipment in a plastic bag with some of those silica gels THEN into the case instead of just placing in a foam case bare. I spent many hours cleaning up a lens from an Arri 2C that had been left in a foam case that became a gummy mess.


  • 0

#19 Charles MacDonald

Charles MacDonald
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1157 posts
  • Other
  • Stittsville Ontario Canada

Posted 03 June 2013 - 10:46 PM

If that the freezer/refrigerator's fault or simply the nature of higher speed film? Are you saying that freezing accelerated the process or could it have an extended a relatively short life anyway?

 

Here's another question, does film stored in a freezer/refrigerator put out any harmful chemicals into the air that would be bad for any food also stored there? In other words, do I need a completely separate fridge for film? Don't want to poison anyone...

 

Freezing extends the life of film. (assuming that the film is factory sealed, and the data sheet allows storage at that low temperature.  apparently some films don't like to be frozen)

 

BUT the higher speed films tend to be affected by things like Cosmic Rays, and so they will fog over time no mater what the temperature.

 

as far as the safety of film, my understanding is at is almost edible.  You want to seal the cans to keep the mosture out, and to rpotect from condensation.  I like to use Ziplock style bags to add an extra layer of protection.  That should keep things under control until out open the can in the dark and inhale the WONDERFUL AROMA - Fresh Film!


  • 0

#20 David Cunningham

David Cunningham
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1049 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 04 June 2013 - 08:34 AM

That should keep things under control until out open the can in the dark and inhale the WONDERFUL AROMA - Fresh Film!

 

My wife rolls her eyes at me every time I open a new pack of Super 8 or can of daylight 16mm and take a big whiff with a smile... like an addict.  


  • 1


Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Willys Widgets

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Opal

Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Paralinx LLC

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Technodolly

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products