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Difference of movie speed and a regular camera's speed


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#1 Bryan Smith

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 03:02 PM

Playing around with my Canon 7D and comparing that towards a movie, I recognize that there's some speed thing going on. Here's an example of what I'm talking about.

The Canon 7D:

and a Movie Trailer:




There's some difference that I know but can't explain quite well, but I'll try to:

So recording with the 7D, the quality looks more... lively. More like a "it looks like I'm in the video and the world is going at normal speed" kind of thing. Yes it's hard. Whereas in a movie in the box office, there is something that really makes a difference and I just don't know what it is. I'm also looking to get myself a camcorder but I really don't want to get a camera that really looks like the 7D. I'm trying to get a cinematic look instead of a lively kind of look. Hopefully this is understandable. Just watch a movie, and compare that speed/quality to a movie you see with a 7D. Please help explain the difference! I also would like help to find a camera that makes my movies look like what you see in the cinema... not the most expensive ones but of course something in a budget.

I looked at the JVC GY HD200. Damn, it's really hard to explain! :(
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#2 Travis Gray

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 03:09 PM

Someone with more knowledge on this may be able to shed some more light on this, but just based on what I've seen in DSLR videos..


It may have to do with shutter speed. Since film cameras run at 180ยบ typically, that equates to a 1/48 shutter speed at 24fps on other cameras without angle specifications. I've noticed a good majority of people, in order to get a exposure that isn't crazy blown out mostly, and doesn't use ND filters or can't stop down the aperture anymore, will bump up the shutter speed. That can have an effect on the look (depending on what you're going for).

Could also have to do with techniques. Hand-held vs tripod or other stabilizer. That plus shutter speed differences may also affect the feeling of it.

That's my best guess.
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#3 Bryan Smith

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Posted 07 May 2012 - 03:17 PM

Playing around with my Canon 7D and comparing that towards a movie, I recognize that there's some speed thing going on. Here's an example of what I'm talking about.

The Canon 7D:

and a Movie Trailer:




There's some difference that I know but can't explain quite well, but I'll try to:

So recording with the 7D, the quality looks more... lively. More like a "it looks like I'm in the video and the world is going at normal speed" kind of thing. Yes it's hard. Whereas in a movie in the box office, there is something that really makes a difference and I just don't know what it is. I'm also looking to get myself a camcorder but I really don't want to get a camera that really looks like the 7D. I'm trying to get a cinematic look instead of a lively kind of look. Hopefully this is understandable. Just watch a movie, and compare that speed/quality to a movie you see with a 7D. Please help explain the difference! I also would like help to find a camera that makes my movies look like what you see in the cinema... not the most expensive ones but of course something in a budget.

I looked at the JVC GY HD200. Damn, it's really hard to explain! :(



MIGHT OF FOUND A BETTER ANGLE ON WHAT CAMERA I'M LOOK AT! GreyScale which is a movie on youtube by Daron Films

These guys inspire me and their camera and how that compares to something a 7D would shoot is what I'm trying to get and what I want!
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Visual Products

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Opal

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

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Broadcast Solutions Inc

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