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White costume on white background?


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#1 Pattyjae

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 06:13 AM

Hi there,

I'm shooting a music video next week and have a concern about the clothing worn by the musicians. The visual concept of the clip is basically the lead singer (who has quite dark skin) wearing black, and the other members of the band (lighter skin tones) wearing white clothing. They will be singing in front of a pure white background, I'm planning to blow it out completely. The clip will also be in black and white.

The artist is adamant that the band wear white clothing, despite my concerns of there being a lack of contrast and definition in them. So I am wondering if anyone has any lighting tips for helping me stop them from just melting into the background.

Thanks!

Pattyjae
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#2 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 07:06 AM

Well, if you light the background and try to avoid light on the subjects, there should be decent contrast - but then you'll want to see the subjects as well.

Can you sidelight them or something, to introduce some shadow into foreground objects?
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#3 David A Smith

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 10:04 AM

Look at the 50 second mark in this video

Link


My feeling is always do TEST SHOTS. Even if it's on a small scale using one band member. When you say "blow it out" that may not be the term you want to have in your head but what I think you are saying is you are going to blow out the white back drop.

My opinion is you light the 2 separately then you have control over contrast and brightness on each surface - the backdrop and then the talent. If you just blow it all out with all lights forward and pointed at both the talent and the backdrop it will be an issue

It's like lighting Green screen in some sense, not exactly but you light the back drop separately from the talent

And keep them at a distance from the backdrop, not right up against it or a few feet, you want control of backdrop versus subject

I would do a small test shot because I have worked with bands and there is nothing worse than an entire band unhappy with their decisions and images.





Hi there,

I'm shooting a music video next week and have a concern about the clothing worn by the musicians. The visual concept of the clip is basically the lead singer (who has quite dark skin) wearing black, and the other members of the band (lighter skin tones) wearing white clothing. They will be singing in front of a pure white background, I'm planning to blow it out completely. The clip will also be in black and white.

The artist is adamant that the band wear white clothing, despite my concerns of there being a lack of contrast and definition in them. So I am wondering if anyone has any lighting tips for helping me stop them from just melting into the background.

Thanks!

Pattyjae


Edited by David A Smith, 09 May 2012 - 10:07 AM.

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#4 David A Smith

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Posted 09 May 2012 - 10:12 AM

Look at the 50 second mark in this video

Link


My feeling is always do TEST SHOTS. Even if it's on a small scale using one band member. When you say "blow it out" that may not be the term you want to have in your head but what I think you are saying is you are going to blow out the white back drop.

My opinion is you light the 2 separately then you have control over contrast and brightness on each surface - the backdrop and then the talent. If you just blow it all out with all lights forward and pointed at both the talent and the backdrop it will be an issue

It's like lighting Green screen in some sense, not exactly but you light the back drop separately from the talent

And keep them at a distance from the backdrop, not right up against it or a few feet, you want control of backdrop versus subject

I can't say enough about TEST shots. They seem to be a thing of the past with many filmmakers and in reality it becomes a time saver on the actual set when you go to shoot and in post production when you find out little correction is needed

I would do a small test shot because I have worked with bands and there is nothing worse than an entire band unhappy with their decisions and images.


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Metropolis Post

Willys Widgets

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Technodolly

Glidecam

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