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Beautiful 35mm


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#1 David J Paradise

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 09:08 AM

You know, 35mm will always be beautiful to me. In fact, as strange as this seems, I still dream about 35mm film and cameras. Yes, it's true.
Maybe I'm rare but you know what, I don't care because I truly love the look and the smell of film, the camera curves on those gorgeous BL's,
the texture of the paint. Seriously, even the texture, the touch and hint of grease and oil gives me a buzz.
I'll never part with my film gear, for me it's part of the family.
Maybe I'm somewhat selfish but you know what? All those delightful cameras leaving the rental houses for the last time, with their chipped paint and knock-about abuse, are welcome to join my nearest and dearest. I'll tend to their wounds, venerate them and show-off their magnificence. Yes, I can taste the slendour, smell the elegance and listen to the gentle, contented purr for evermore. And I'll bless them with film, real film for the creative endeavor of capturing breathtaking images imbued with emotions that only belongs to beautiful 35mm.
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#2 David J Paradise

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 06:21 PM

Oops! I dropped a 'p'. It should say: I can taste the splendour.
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#3 Andrew Glenn Miller

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 06:51 PM

It is your primal instinct, David. You are a Man, and a Man needs his film.

Even though I am only in my early 20's, and even though I didn't grow up with film as the only option, I am still drawn to it. I would shoot film over plastic any day.

Viva la revolution!

Edited by Andrew Glenn Miller, 10 May 2012 - 06:54 PM.

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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 07:17 PM

I think there are enough people who feel this way that historic preservation of film cameras is unlikely to be a problem. The same can be said for a lot I'd things - there's a group of people in the UK who maintain a couple of old Lightning jet fighters which they've been clearly told by the aviation regulator they'll never be allowed to fly, just for the sake of the history.

I fear a similar fate may befall the historic film camera movement, though. I suspect it'll be less than ten years before 35mm film stock becomes really hard to get.
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#5 David J Paradise

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Posted 11 May 2012 - 10:16 AM

I remember sceptics back in the 90s stubbornly stating the end of Super 8, it all seemed very convincing at the time.
I think if anyone had an inkling back then, of the varieties available today, they'd be lost for words and most likely nobody would believe it.
Without doubt there's major turmoil ocurring, especially at Kodak. However, I have faith in film being around a lot longer than some think.
It all feels a bit déjà vu; been there and heard it all before. There was truly no reason to worry because we can still satisfy our S8 cravings.
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#6 Will Montgomery

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 09:11 AM

You know, 35mm will always be beautiful to me. In fact, as strange as this seems, I still dream about 35mm film and cameras. Yes, it's true.


I still wake up and think, "It's a Kodachrome day." or "Time to break out the 250D." maybe "Tri-X today..." I judge the weather by the film stock I would use to shoot outside.
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#7 Jay Stewart

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Posted 15 May 2012 - 01:46 PM

I remember sceptics back in the 90s stubbornly stating the end of Super 8, it all seemed very convincing at the time.
I think if anyone had an inkling back then, of the varieties available today, they'd be lost for words and most likely nobody would believe it.
Without doubt there's major turmoil ocurring, especially at Kodak. However, I have faith in film being around a lot longer than some think.
It all feels a bit déjà vu; been there and heard it all before. There was truly no reason to worry because we can still satisfy our S8 cravings.


It doesn't look good. Vancouver is now losing their joint Technicolor/Deluxe lab and I hear a lot of lab closings are in the works for LA - to come official early 2013. You can still buy it sure, but where do you get it developed?
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#8 David J Paradise

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 10:50 AM

It doesn't look good. Vancouver is now losing their joint Technicolor/Deluxe lab and I hear a lot of lab closings are in the works for LA - to come official early 2013. You can still buy it sure, but where do you get it developed?


Even though there's a seismic shift to digital projection with subsequent labs closing, I truly believe there will always be places where you can get film developed.
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#9 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 21 May 2012 - 05:00 PM

I'm not sure that's the big problem, is it? You can, if you're sufficiently dedicated, process even colour neg in a bucket in the bathroom.
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#10 David J Paradise

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Posted 22 May 2012 - 03:34 PM

I'm not sure that's the big problem, is it? You can, if you're sufficiently dedicated, process even colour neg in a bucket in the bathroom.


Have you heard the one, that's been going round a while now, about the excentric Rajasthani billionaire?
Has a penchant for Technicolor and obtained the equipment from China with the aim of resurrecting the dye transfer technology in the bathroom of his mansion.
Not quite bath-tub processing but close enough.
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#11 Nicolas Gomez

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 09:52 PM

Nothing will ever beat good old 35. Its a shame that its always expensive, I wish we could shoot celluloid instead of digital... But tell that to a cliente or a producer, its all about the money... Still I stick to the analog 35 revolution!

http://www.elsotano.com.co
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#12 Phil Thompson

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 02:51 AM

With you here. I dont care if it's expensive. I've dedicated my life to 35mm. You only live once. Why on earth would anyone want to compromise and shoot digital? LIFE IS SHORT. I will live like a pauper just so i can shoot 35mm, have it developed, scanned and when the time is right. PRINTED!! This is a great time to be shooting 35mm you cant get Arri 35 BL's for 3 grand!! thats the same camera they used on GOODFELLAS!! HELLO!! WAKEY WAKEY!!
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