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Rotoscoping at its finest


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#1 jordan nizich

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 09:45 AM

My linkHello all,

I have been recently been looking into rotoscoping as I am very interested in the concpet and I want to try and duplicate that myself for a YouTube video. I have been doing a lot of research looking at videos and tutorials and I actually came across a video that did exactly just that and I want to share that with you that has really inspired me to try this! It just blew my mind how in the video I didn’t realize it was the same actor playing different characters and then the ending with it’s bring surprised just made the piece that much better. On top of that the humor is pretty dark and funny as well. I found the video at vimeo at spot cinema, worth a look. I just can’t believe how flawless the video is, characters crossing over one another without any interference, I really hope I can reach that level of expertise.

Hope you enjoy supadupa

[url="<iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/38544065?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;color=ffffff" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0" webkitAllowFullScreen mozallowfullscreen allowFullScreen></iframe>"]My link[/url]

-----> My link
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#2 dan kessler

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 11:10 AM

I wonder if the technique is being correctly described here.

Rotoscoping is essentially a process of hand-tracing elements within
a shot for matting purposes or hand-painting elements to match.

It is laboriously and painstakingly executed frame-by-frame, and while
the results can be superb, it is very unlikely that this is how the
sample video was done.

Where actors are to be composited over background plates or incorporated
into other visual effects, they are usually filmed against a blue or green screen.
It's the colored surround that provides the basis for a relatively swift matte
extraction. If you had to do it by hand, it would take agonizing months to complete.
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#3 Travis Gray

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 11:19 AM

Agreed. You'll notice there's really not a ton of overlap. So, you shoot your plates or your first layer stuff, then the second part of the scene just could use a small green or blue panel to use over the trouble spots and then a garbage matte to work it in. Never done it, but I've seen some simple things done this way and it looks like this.


But, maybe it's a post to garnish some more views on the page too haha. Classy.
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#4 jordan nizich

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Posted 10 May 2012 - 12:34 PM

Dan to be honest with you I have no idea how long it took, F*%k not only is it going to take me a while to learn how to do this but to edit :o oh my

Jordan Supadupa
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