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7222 double-x test


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#1 Pablo Mollenhauer

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 05:42 AM

Hi,

I've shot 100ft of 16mm double-x in a ARRI 16SR. This was the test for check the camera. The lab told me that I would get the film the 1 of June, but I am on hurry and I need the test as soon as possible.

I wondering if I could cut a piece of the film and processing it for myself with D-76 or D-11 in a 35mm tank (I do not have Lomo tan). However, I was not able to find any time table for the times of procesing using these chemicals.

can someone help me, or giving me an advice to process this film.

I'm in London.

BW

Pablo Mollenhauer
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#2 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 12:27 PM

Hi,

I've shot 100ft of 16mm double-x in a ARRI 16SR. This was the test for check the camera. The lab told me that I would get the film the 1 of June, but I am on hurry and I need the test as soon as possible.

I wondering if I could cut a piece of the film and processing it for myself with D-76 or D-11 in a 35mm tank (I do not have Lomo tan). However, I was not able to find any time table for the times of procesing using these chemicals.

can someone help me, or giving me an advice to process this film.

I'm in London.

BW

Pablo Mollenhauer


Average turn-around times for processing B&W is about a week. Did the lab tell you why it would take so long? Explain to them that you need the film back sooner than that and get them to put a rush on it. I don't advise processing your own film unless you really know what you're doing. Even so, then how would you print it?...

Leave it to the professionals.
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#3 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 03:37 PM

I wondering if I could cut a piece of the film and processing it for myself with D-76 or D-11 in a 35mm tank (I do not have Lomo tan). However, I was not able to find any time table for the times of procesing using these chemicals.


I have sometimes used a 16mm still tank, which holds about 5ft to do a camera check. Obviously this does not give you accurate information on camera speed and such but can be a go-nogo check of basic operation, lens focus and such.

The Massive developer chart does have times that have worked for others with using Double-X as a still film.
http://www.digitaltr...per=&mdc=Search

7222 would be treated the same as 5222, which is the stock that still photographers are more likely to use.

Looks like 7 minutes in straight D76/ID11 and 10 minutes for 1:1 assuming ISO 250. But your mileage may vary.

Still Photographers do tend to want a higher gamma than is traditional for movies so the test negative proably would not inter-cut into regular negative so it would proably not work to shoot your next feature 10 seconds at a time and use a still tank.

A "Yankee Clipper II" film tank may be not hard to find on e-bay and does take 5 ft lengths of 16mm film

Edited by Charles MacDonald, 13 May 2012 - 03:42 PM.

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Visual Products

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