Jump to content


Photo

develop Kodachrome 40 with cafenol home process


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 Niall Conroy

Niall Conroy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 92 posts
  • Other
  • Ireland

Posted 21 May 2012 - 03:09 PM

hey guys,

I know Kodachrome and its developing process have been retired, which means its pretty near impossible to get it developed now (except for some Canadian company which I hear can develop it to black and white)

however, I was wondering would it be possible to develop some 40 with the cafenol home developing process - from my initial research it seems near every film stock can be developed in some form with cafenol.

I have 4 super-8 carts of the K40, so it would be nice to experiment with them.

anyone have any ideas?
  • 0

#2 John Salim

John Salim
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 182 posts
  • Other
  • Essex, UK

Posted 25 May 2012 - 07:38 AM

Here's some info for you Niall.....

http://www.super8cam.../processing.php

http://www.dagiebrundert.de/EK40.html


Good luck !
John S :P
  • 0

#3 Niall Conroy

Niall Conroy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 92 posts
  • Other
  • Ireland

Posted 28 May 2012 - 01:13 PM

Here's some info for you Niall.....

http://www.super8cam.../processing.php

http://www.dagiebrundert.de/EK40.html


Good luck !
John S :P


Thanks, John. Very helpful and encouraging :)
  • 0

#4 Niall Conroy

Niall Conroy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 92 posts
  • Other
  • Ireland

Posted 30 May 2012 - 10:09 AM

Thanks, John. Very helpful and encouraging :)


Hey guys, just in case anyone ever stumbles across this post looking for info on the topic - I emailed Dagie from his website: http://www.dagiebrundert.de/EK40.html

He said it is possible and he has done it many times - basically it should develop the K40 just as good as any other black and white developer into a negative form, which usually produces great results. So good news!

If i ever get around to testing this later in the summer i'll be sure to post my results.

Also, i misspelled "caffenol" in the topic title, maybe an admin could amend that?
  • 0

#5 Charles MacDonald

Charles MacDonald
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1157 posts
  • Other
  • Stittsville Ontario Canada

Posted 30 May 2012 - 04:24 PM

basically it should develop the K40 just as good as any other black and white developer into a negative form,


Don't forget that Kodachrome has REMJET backing, which is not normaly found on other Black and White Films.
  • 0

#6 Richard Tuohy

Richard Tuohy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 482 posts
  • Other
  • Daylesford, Australia

Posted 31 May 2012 - 03:42 AM

Yes, its the remjet that is the only problem.
And Dagie is a 'she'...
  • 0

#7 Niall Conroy

Niall Conroy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 92 posts
  • Other
  • Ireland

Posted 31 May 2012 - 12:36 PM

my apologies to Dagie!

Yes, the remjet - i've read conflicting things about its toughness - some claim it rubs right off with your fingers - others say its stubborn enough and needs to be soaked in special chemicals

i'm guessing the negatives are useless without the remjet fully removed?
  • 0

#8 Richard Tuohy

Richard Tuohy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 482 posts
  • Other
  • Daylesford, Australia

Posted 31 May 2012 - 06:21 PM

Remjet does tend to get harder to remove with age, at least that is my experience of working with old rolls. Any remjet left on the film will apear as white spots or streaks in your image when you make it positive. Generally, diy remjet removal will always leave a moderate amount of this 'sparkle'. After processing, you can help soften the remaining remjet (a good percentage will come off in your developer) by soaking the film in a tray with water with a spoonful of borax disolved in it. You will then need to wipe the film with a cloth or sponge to rub off more of the remjet.
don't expect perfect results. that said, you should do it.
  • 0

#9 Charles MacDonald

Charles MacDonald
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1157 posts
  • Other
  • Stittsville Ontario Canada

Posted 31 May 2012 - 06:51 PM

After processing, you can help soften the remaining remjet (a good percentage will come off in your developer) by soaking the film in a tray with water with a spoonful of borax disolved in it. You will then need to wipe the film with a cloth or sponge to rub off more of the remjet.


From my experience many years ago trying to do ECN still rolls at home, the stuff will be fairly soft after processing, BUT it is very easy to transfer to the emulsion where it will reside for ever.

On my still rolls U used two sponges, one on each side with the firm suspended on a clip. I found I had to rinse the sponge about every 9 inches of film. and my Jobo reels, which normally don't pick up any chemicals were a bit dark for about 6 months afterward. the sponge on the emulsion side was to try and keep the black stuff from passing thorough the Perforations. YMMV.
  • 0

#10 Niall Conroy

Niall Conroy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 92 posts
  • Other
  • Ireland

Posted 01 June 2012 - 09:10 AM

Remjet does tend to get harder to remove with age, at least that is my experience of working with old rolls. Any remjet left on the film will apear as white spots or streaks in your image when you make it positive. Generally, diy remjet removal will always leave a moderate amount of this 'sparkle'. After processing, you can help soften the remaining remjet (a good percentage will come off in your developer) by soaking the film in a tray with water with a spoonful of borax disolved in it. You will then need to wipe the film with a cloth or sponge to rub off more of the remjet.
don't expect perfect results. that said, you should do it.


so i'm guessing this soaking process with the borax would be after the fixer - so I wouldn't have to do it inside a darkroom?
  • 0

#11 Richard Tuohy

Richard Tuohy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 482 posts
  • Other
  • Daylesford, Australia

Posted 01 June 2012 - 08:16 PM

so i'm guessing this soaking process with the borax would be after the fixer - so I wouldn't have to do it inside a darkroom?

yes, that's right
of course, this isn't the kodak preferred way of removing remjet, but its what diy people do. Kodak would have the remjet removed before development - but that means in the dark.
  • 0

#12 Niall Conroy

Niall Conroy
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 92 posts
  • Other
  • Ireland

Posted 11 September 2012 - 02:05 PM

Many thanks for all the info above, finally got around to trying this out - still a work in progress, but heres the first test I did with the Kodachrome 40:



Posted Image

Edited by Niall Conroy, 11 September 2012 - 02:06 PM.

  • 0


Ritter Battery

Rig Wheels Passport

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Metropolis Post

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

Opal

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

CineTape

CineLab

Visual Products

The Slider

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Technodolly

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Aerial Filmworks