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Filters for a 90's film


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#1 Tony Muna

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Posted 28 May 2012 - 07:23 PM

Quickly: I'm new and a student to the world of cinematography.

I am set to shoot a horror/suspense thriller out in the woods set to be in the 80's. A thought popped in my head, how can I make this a film that is obviously in the 80's but shot with advance color in the early 90's.

Like I said I am completely new and I don't know what lenses and film stocks that were commonly used in the early 90's.

I was hoping that those who know could point me in the right direction to pull off such a look.

I know that each film stock has its own taste in color and grain. I think knowing the characteristic of the stocks used in the early 90's and how that was advance to the previous stock could help me with the renting process for filters.

What I'm set to use...
Camera: R1MX
Lenses: available for the shoot but open to other suggestions: Arri SuperSpeeds MKIIs.

Director notes: He wants a hi-contrast with bluish blacks tone to it.

what filters could help me achieve that look and open to other lenses as well.

Thank you in advance for you time reading and responding!!

* I would like to use filter in front of the lenses and is open to nets in the rear. I would like to stay away from adding the filters in post. I know its going to be expensive and I would like to help cut cost down in post. I know with proper testing I could enter set with confidence with the filter in front of the lens.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 May 2012 - 12:03 PM

I am set to shoot a horror/suspense thriller out in the woods set to be in the 80's. A thought popped in my head, how can I make this a film that is obviously in the 80's but shot with advance color in the early 90's.

Like I said I am completely new and I don't know what lenses and film stocks that were commonly used in the early 90's.

Director notes: He wants a hi-contrast with bluish blacks tone to it.

what filters could help me achieve that look and open to other lenses as well.


A bit hair-splitty, trying to differentiate an 80's from an 90's look...

Starting in the mid-1980's there were a lot of stocks on the market by Kodak, Fuji, and Agfa, with Kodak being the most commonly-used. The faster stocks were a bit grainier by modern standards, and probably a bit contrastier except for Agfa, which had a kind of warm, low-contrast feeling. I don't know how you'd create the look of any of these stocks in-camera on a digital camera like the Red One. It would be more of a post effect to add some grain to the image.

Hi-contrast is more of a timing and lighting thing. You can create a higher-contrast look for the monitor image from the camera and in the color-correction of the converted footage.

Popular filters of the day were ProMist and Black ProMist. Uncorrected HMI's were popular for blue night exterior scenes.
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#3 Tony Muna

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Posted 01 June 2012 - 12:42 PM

I know you get this a lot, thank you very much for the professional insight!

This is the info I need to start to research the different stocks for post effects. Thank you again Sir.
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#4 Peter James Scott

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Posted 22 June 2012 - 06:33 AM

I can’t offer much practical advice on the matter unfortunately. What I can say though is watch a load of 90’s films and pick out obvious traits about them. Not just from a cinematic point but also general trends such as fashion, haircuts, dialects, slang and crazes. Also look at horrifically 90’s films such as the 1995 Power Rangers movie or the Batman: Forever movie of the same year and note the garish neon colours and weird camera angles the cinematographers use. My main point is to try and pick out the mood, tone and feel of what you want to achieve. Though this is more directors area, I think that capturing that essence will have a knock on effect on how the film looks aesthetically, as well as which filters you use.

One other franchise you could look at is the Friday the 13th series. The series runs though the entire 80’s to the early 90’s. I always thought that though Friday the 13th is mainly 80’s, they still have that playful 90’s feel to them.

Of course, you are probably already doing this and know what you want, but I’d thought I’d try and help out anyway! :)

Hope the film goes alright!

@pjscott89
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

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Abel Cine

The Slider

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Aerial Filmworks

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Metropolis Post