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Red Pro Primes ->to sharp??


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#1 Tadeusz Kieniewicz

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 06:17 PM

What would you do If desire look is to sharp with chosen lenses?Would you go for diffusion filter or fix it in post?
Or some other walk around?

I'm in situation where producer decided to shoot with Red Pro Primes (cuz of budget) and I wanted to shoot with Cooke S4/i. I find Red Primes ultra sharp and I'm thinking what would be the best option to soften the image. I have to notice that I'm not a great fan of soften filters such as classic soft, pro mists etc.

I think I'll try to get desire look in post, what do you guys thinks?

Cheers Ted Kieniewicz.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 04 June 2012 - 07:27 PM

Just use a filter if you want overall softening rather than do it to a thousand shots in post and take up part of your D.I. color-correction time allotted. What's wrong with using a filter if you want to soften the image? Why is digital softening superior? I'd only go with post softening if you think it would only end up being a dozen or so shots that need it. But if all you want is an optically softer lens, then just put some filter in front, almost doesn't matter as long as it is very light because there isn't a lot of sharpness difference between a Cooke S4 and a Red PP. Using a #1/8 Low-Con would almost be too strong but would work. Or a #1/4 Digital Diffusion-FX.
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#3 Tadeusz Kieniewicz

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Posted 06 June 2012 - 07:20 AM

Just use a filter if you want overall softening rather than do it to a thousand shots in post and take up part of your D.I. color-correction time allotted. What's wrong with using a filter if you want to soften the image? Why is digital softening superior? I'd only go with post softening if you think it would only end up being a dozen or so shots that need it. But if all you want is an optically softer lens, then just put some filter in front, almost doesn't matter as long as it is very light because there isn't a lot of sharpness difference between a Cooke S4 and a Red PP. Using a #1/8 Low-Con would almost be too strong but would work. Or a #1/4 Digital Diffusion-FX.


Thank you David! You convinced me. I'll use soft filter rather than fix 1000 shots. Numbers spoke to me.

cheers,

Ted Kieniewicz
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