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Coloring question


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#1 Tony Muna

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Posted 09 June 2012 - 10:26 PM

Hey, please forgive me if this starts to sound weird or what. I am a student to the art of cinematography.

Since I am doing some test footages, I was curious to know how to achieve this look through grading.

I have tried to play with 3-way color correction but I know there's a reason why this look this way and I know it wasn't just one simple layer of color.

Could someone please tell me how exactly do people get this tone and color in the picture below. Probably minus the magenta tint in the skies.

Looks like a low contrast on top of a raw image. Which I tried but I can't seem to figure it out.

Also I'll probably be posting more photos as I come across ones I am curious as well.

Thank you in advance.

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#2 Oliver Hadlow Martin

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 12:19 PM

Play with the saturation, lift, gamma and gain and perhaps introduce some clipping reducing the range of the images.
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#3 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 03:44 PM

Last thing I'd call that is clipped.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 04:19 PM

Just looks like a Log image. Is the question how to make a Rec.709 image look like a Log image?
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#5 Paul Bartok

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 04:38 PM

Play with the saturation, lift, gamma and gain and perhaps introduce some clipping reducing the range of the images.

That's pretty much it, the image colors look milky trying lifting your white and black points.

If it's what David said you'll need to look into changing your gamma space, hit it with a log lut, I would imagine?
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 13 June 2012 - 05:54 PM

Trouble is that it is easier to make low-contrast images into high-contrast images than the other way around, because adding contrast means reducing information, which is easier than adding information that isn't there.

So first of all, you'd have to make sure you were photographing low-contrast images and recording them in a low-contrast format. Then making them milky & pastel shouldn't be too hard because they are already there more or less.

You look at a PanaLog image, for example -- when shooting an 11-step chip chart, the black strip falls somewhere at 10% and white strip somewhere at 70%. So obviously you could take a Rec.709 image and take the blacks from 0 to 10% (milky) and the whites from 100% to 70% (dimmed) but the problem is that there won't be information above 70% as there would be in a Log image.

But it should be possible to take something shot in Rec.709 on an overcast day and make it even milkier and more pastel in post.
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Willys Widgets

Wooden Camera

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CineTape

Metropolis Post

Ritter Battery

The Slider