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5d mark ii


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#1 anroop mri

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 06:21 AM

Hello everybody,i am a director planning to shoot a feature on 5d ii ,i know a little about 35mm and red but never tried 5d,many of my friends are saying i can easily save a lot of money if i do it on 5d,but the thing thts bothering me is, nobody is able to tell how sucessfully i can get the film look on 5d,some are saying ,i would have digital look whatever i do and some say it depends,i will be very thankful to them who can guide me in the right direction,thank you.
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 07:08 AM

I suppose it depends on what you mean by the "film look."

Also, I'd not want to shoot a feature on a 5D. Sure, it can be done, but something like an F3, or FS100/700, or Scarlet/Epic/One or Alexa might be a much better solution for you, and certainly be more "friendly" to work with in terms of the crew-- not to mention give you a much stronger starting image for any post manipulations needed.
5D is a fine camera for what it is and makes a great augmentation to another digital system when you need a small camera to fit into places. Also it's fine for web/short films ect, and if you can't afford anything better. But, I'd say in a feature production, it will be more of a hindrance than a help if used as an "a" cam.
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#3 Travis Gray

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Posted 18 June 2012 - 08:25 AM

I wouldn't shoot with a 5D either.

If anything, the film look is ruined by the full frame sensor. You don't want to shoot too open because you'll have such a small DOF.

+1 on the Sony stuff. The flexibility is awesome. You can record to cards or output to an external recorder, have proper timecode, great options for building a rig, you can wire audio right in and be able to work with it easier. And you have better control with picture profiles (can be done on a DSLR, but I find it's easier and more options with an actual camera for video)


The "film look" depends on a lot of factors. 24p is one thing, sure. Proper shutter speed is another. And you could shoot a certain picture profile, but just grading in post and adding effects may not do it. Pay attention to lighting in films vs video.
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#4 anroop mri

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Posted 20 June 2012 - 12:39 PM

First of all thank you adrian and travis,@ adrian film look i meant, was that on film stock image looks matte,where as on didgital it looks more glossy or shiny or also can say more mettalic, i dont know how else to explain,but for many years our eyes have been so used to watch films shot on film formats which gives it a look ,when i shot on digital it felt more like video than film ,not exactly but i am just trying to put all my words together for u to understand what my intention or need is ,and to be more clear i dont think audience really care about what we shoot on ,but in the end i dont want them to feel it would have been better if he shot on film (kind of comment)hope u got my point ,thank you.
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#5 Eric Diosay

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 01:59 PM

Shane Hurlbut, ASC, used a 5D2, 7D and a 1D to shoot 70% of his last feature Act of Valor. He has the advantage of being an excellent lighter and access to an awesome post-house to release a really good looking film.

That being said, every camera has it's issues and workarounds. Lighting for DSLRs is absolutely necessary. If you can light, then I don't see an issue with using the 5D. As to the question of "film" look, check out Act of Valor.

Edited by Eric Diosay, 21 June 2012 - 02:00 PM.

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#6 Kieran Scannell

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Posted 21 June 2012 - 03:07 PM

Also check out a Dutch film " Rabat " shot entirely on the 5D and 7D! Once again It's much less about the gear and more about the story,
the performance and the skill of the filmmakers. If you want a film look shoot film!
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#7 Daniel Jackson

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Posted 27 June 2012 - 01:04 AM

Shane Hurlbut, ASC, used a 5D2, 7D and a 1D to shoot 70% of his last feature Act of Valor. He has the advantage of being an excellent lighter and access to an awesome post-house to release a really good looking film.

That being said, every camera has it's issues and workarounds. Lighting for DSLRs is absolutely necessary. If you can light, then I don't see an issue with using the 5D. As to the question of "film" look, check out Act of Valor.


Act Of Valor looks surprisingly good considering just how it was shot.
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#8 Nicolas Gomez

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 09:56 PM

There are many Colombian films shot on 5Ds. These cameras work great, but they will never be as good as an epic. Still you have to consider the budget issue, 5Ds are very accessible. Try to have great optics and be very careful about the DOF, use lenses with a good F setting and a nice picture style. Good luck with that film!

http://www.elsotano.com.co
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#9 Mathew Rudenberg

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 11:57 PM

The term 'film look' is kind of unquantifiable. You describe it as glossy vs matte, which to me sounds like mostly the difference between saturated and desaturated. Certainly film has some other qualities which digital is yet to match (although the Alexa probably comes closest)

But I'm a pragmatist and I would say the truth is simple: If you can afford to shoot film and you love film then shoot film. If you cannot afford to shoot film but want to shoot the movie anyway then pick the best camera you can afford to shoot with and use that.

The 5D II is cheap and there aren't a lot of options in that price range. the most filmic looking camera (color wise) in that price range will probably be the new black magic camera based on shooting raw and the tests I've seen - but that hasn't been released yet.

If you do choose to use the 5D use the technicolor profiles to maximise your post color correction potential. Use the TVlogic VFM-056WP so you can pass through to HD-SDI and monitor your exposure with a waveform. Use cinema style lenses with an EF mount - the Zeiss CP.2s are the best bet. Be aware that you will face moire, rolling shutter, and only 720p true resolution.

Test the cameras available to you and choose the one that looks best to you. Some people love the DSLR look and some people hate it, you will have to decide for yourself. I think the 5D II looks good for the price range, but you can't expect to squeeze water from a stone.
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