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How long can exposed film last before processed


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#1 Phil Thompson

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 04:17 PM

2 questions.

1.) how long can you store exposed film for in the fridge, before you process it.
2.) how long can you store film you've had processed and not scanned? Basically i want to shoot a load of stuff, and save it to scan in a giant batch.

Tauts?
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#2 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 04:47 PM

1.) how long can you store exposed film for in the fridge, before you process it.


They normally recommend "as soon as possible" but folks often get 6 months with "correctable Results" Read up on the Story of "The man who skied down Everest" (http://en.wikipedia....ed_Down_Everest ) in that case the original producer could not pay to get any of the footage processed and had it all sitting in coded cans (so no one else could proceed) for a LONG time until he made a deal with Budge Crawley for the rights. Budge Processed it and made a Winner out of the footage, he even exhibited his OSCAR at the Ottawa Exibition.


2.) how long can you store film you've had processed and not scanned? Basically i want to shoot a load of stuff, and save it to scan in a giant batch.


stored carefully, 10-50 years.
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#3 Phil Thompson

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 05:21 PM

Thanks Charles, very interesting little story. Cheers. I'm guessing the best way would be to have the film developed and then put in a fridge. Am I right?
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#4 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 07:22 PM

Thanks Charles, very interesting little story. Cheers. I'm guessing the best way would be to have the film developed and then put in a fridge. Am I right?

No. A fridge is a hyper humid environment. You have to have film in a sealed container to put in in a fridge so as wet air doesn't get in. Whereas you don't want to keep acetate in a sealed tin if you want to keep it archivally. Just a cool dry place, preferably not humid.
ricahrd
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#5 Kevin W Wilson

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Posted 29 June 2012 - 10:47 PM

Kubrick stored half exposed film for 2001: A Space Odyssey in refrigerators for several years, shooting part of a shot with the lens masked then unloading the film and storing it until the other half could be shot. If Kubrick thought it was fine, then it must not be that big a deal!

Edited by Kevin W Wilson, 29 June 2012 - 10:48 PM.

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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 02:46 PM

That's pretty faulty logic there Kevin. Not only are we talking years ago when film was made of different stuff; but it's a bit of a "well my friend won money at the casino, so i will too."

Keep your film in a cool dry place, dry is very important, and process it as soon as possible. I tend to keep any un-exposed stuff I have in my living room, on the floor, in a milk-crate out of sunlight, so it gets the benefit of the AC, and get it processed as soon as you can. Granted, though, you'd be surprised how much abuse film can really take.
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#7 Phil Thompson

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 06:20 AM

So basicallly I should get it processed straight away, but it's cool if I keep processed film on the floor in my bedroom in London before it gets a scan?
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#8 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 08:38 AM

Yes Phil;
Process as soon as possible, and until then keep in a cool dry place (dry is very important, but not NO humidity at all which'll cause the film to brittle). And the same goes for once it is processed. I forget exactly how they archive film forever, but I seem to think it's around 45~55 F and around 40% relative humidity, but a quick e mail to Kodak or Fuji would certainly be able to answer those questions.
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#9 Bryan Chernick

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 01:00 PM

I have 8mm home movies from 1937 that are still in great condition. If you keep it in a cool dry place like a closet in an air conditioned home you will do great. If you put it in your garage where it is exposed to heat, cold, humidity etc it wont last near as long. Here is a great article on film preservation: The Library of Congress Unlocks The Ultimate Archive System

Some more information: Preservation Research of the National Film Preservation Board
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#10 Kevin W Wilson

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 06:51 PM

Sorry Adrian, just keeping it light. No harm meant.
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#11 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 02 July 2012 - 08:04 PM

Bah, Kevin, no reason to be sorry @ all. I'm getting crotchety I think as i get "older." ;)

(p.s. anyone else feel odd that we need emotioncons online? I always feel odd 'bout 'em)
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#12 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 14 July 2012 - 09:41 PM

We developed some Plus-X negative from 1972 last year and it actually had some passable pictures on it, I think that if you develop your film withing about a year it will be fine. I shot a feature on Fuji Eterna (mostly) a few years ago and some of the film was not developed for six or seven months after I shot it and looked great.

And yes I part own and work in a lab... cobblers shoes...

-Rob-
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Wooden Camera

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