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A Question of vocabulary


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#1 Ben Vost

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 11:06 AM

Hi all,

First-time poster but I've been using the site for a project I'm working on translating a French training DVD for cinematographic techniques. I'm stuck on one particular term and don't want to use the wrong one in English, let me describe the situation. I'm sure you're all familiar with Rope, so what is the type of cut called where Hitchcock films and moves the camera into the back of one of the protagonists so he can pull out and although it looks seamless he has started a new shot? Not sure I have explained it well enough, so if necessary please come back to me.

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#2 Ben Vost

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 11:48 AM

I have another one as well. In French cinematography they talk of a "Plan rapproché taille" and a "Plan rapproché poitrine". Here's a pic to show you my dilemma. To me they are both medium close-ups but of course one is closer up :)

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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 01:06 PM

Hi all,

First-time poster but I've been using the site for a project I'm working on translating a French training DVD for cinematographic techniques. I'm stuck on one particular term and don't want to use the wrong one in English, let me describe the situation. I'm sure you're all familiar with Rope, so what is the type of cut called where Hitchcock films and moves the camera into the back of one of the protagonists so he can pull out and although it looks seamless he has started a new shot? Not sure I have explained it well enough, so if necessary please come back to me.

B


There isn't an official term for that, I would tend to use the term "hidden cut" and describe it more in detail because that phrase is too vague or broad.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 01:08 PM

I have another one as well. In French cinematography they talk of a "Plan rapproché taille" and a "Plan rapproché poitrine". Here's a pic to show you my dilemma. To me they are both medium close-ups but of course one is closer up :)

B


On a movie set, we are just likely to be descriptive and say "a waist-up shot" or a "chest-up shot" (though the less polite term when shooting women is a "2T's shot".)
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#5 Ben Vost

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 02:42 PM

:D That's great, thanks David. Since I explain what it is I'm doing (or rather what the author is doing in French and I'm translating) in both I'm glad I don't need to trip up on specific jargon.

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Aerial Filmworks

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Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post