Jump to content


Photo

Police car lights


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 Isaac Brooks

Isaac Brooks
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 38 posts
  • Other

Posted 02 August 2012 - 06:12 PM

Hi,

I'm about to shoot a scene where someone is pulled over in a car, with a traffic cop behind them. I don't have access to a real police cruiser, and was planning on filming it tight. It's sort of a dream-scene type thing, and the close-up of the driver is really what's important. I've got an omni light to do the whole flood / spot light that the cops sometimes do when the pull you over, but I was hoping to have something that mimics the flashing light atop the car. I'm looking at those magnetic lights for use on non-commercial vehicles. Anyone tried this? Or know of more effective, affordable solutions?

I'm shooting on black and white reversal 16mm, and I've got a set of zeiss super speeds.

Thanks in advance.

Isaac
  • 0

#2 James Steven Beverly

James Steven Beverly
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 4199 posts
  • Director
  • El Paso, Texas

Posted 13 August 2012 - 01:00 PM

They don't really use those anymore, they're all pretty much have the light-bars which are blue BUT for an ultra low budget production dream sequence, shot in black and white, a yellow (the color of the light shouldn't make too much of a difference at your budget but if it does, you can always change out the plastic globe to a red one which you should be able to find online) rotating magnetic beacon light that plugs into the cigarette lighter as one might see on an old tow truck (you should be able to find a good used one from a junkyard pretty cheap), set on an appropriate style car (rent a newer Chevy Caprice or Ford Taurus), dimly lit should get the point across. I would shoot at night, through the front windshield of the car being pulled over, with the "police cruiser" behind dimly lit and seen through the rear window of the front car. If there is a policeman involved, keep the shot slightly wide to encompass the driver's side of the frame so the cop will be in the shot as he walks up to the driver's side window while using a wide angle lens to help compress the image depth thereby further camouflaging the police car. Watch your coverage angles and use tight shots so that you avoid the police car so as to not bring attention to it once you've established it's location behind the first car then simply finish the edit. B)

Edited by James Steven Beverly, 13 August 2012 - 01:03 PM.

  • 0

#3 David Mullen ASC

David Mullen ASC
  • Sustaining Members
  • 19769 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 13 August 2012 - 02:29 PM

If you just need the effect from off-camera try hanging a 1x1 mirror from a string and wind it up so that it spins when let go, and then bounce a light into it. Even better a 2-sided mirror and even better a 3-sided mirror box on a turntable.
  • 0

#4 John David Miller

John David Miller
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 125 posts
  • Grip
  • Los Angeles

Posted 25 August 2012 - 02:30 PM

If you just need the effect from off-camera try hanging a 1x1 mirror from a string and wind it up so that it spins when let go, and then bounce a light into it. Even better a 2-sided mirror and even better a 3-sided mirror box on a turntable.


I've used this method with 4'x4' mirrors with blue and red gel taped to the mirror surface 50/50. We were shooting in color and day ext. and it looked great.
  • 0

#5 Lisa Talley

Lisa Talley

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • Other
  • California

Posted 25 October 2012 - 06:31 PM

I had a DP who just set up 2 tota-lights, one with a blue gel and one with a red gel, and had a PA swivel them on the stands left and right. Came out all right, I thought.

Video Production
  • 0

#6 Christopher Sheneman

Christopher Sheneman
  • Guests

Posted 05 December 2012 - 07:19 AM

I'd use a strobe. They produce evil light, you can gel them for different colors super easy and most police light bars these days are, in fact, strobes. You can get them as cheap as $20 and most are variable speed, etc. I think a strobe is going to look the most realistic.

Or if you aren't moving the car much and you can get a Crown Victoria or whatever they're using these days as a cruiser..try these guys
http://www.detfilmsh...ightBars01.html
http://www.detfilmsh...ightBars02.html


awesome free stuff
http://www.detonatio.../free_stuff.htm
  • 0

#7 Zachary J Esters

Zachary J Esters
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 25 posts
  • Gaffer
  • Greenville, MS

Posted 10 January 2013 - 07:12 AM

For very cheap you can purchase beacon lights online. Buy two or three of these, and experiment with the timing.


Zachary J. Esters
  • 0


FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Metropolis Post

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

Opal

Willys Widgets

Rig Wheels Passport

CineTape

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Metropolis Post