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Camera of choice?


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#1 Brian Mead

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Posted 05 August 2012 - 08:40 AM

Hey everyone,

I've just recently become interested in filming and was wondering what everyones camera of choice was?
I was considering going with the "Sony HDR-FX7" as I heard CMOS was recently the way to go. Also, should I even be wasting my time with digital film? I will be shooting short films, and possible music videos with my own lights and hopefully certain natural lighting shots.

I'm hoping to start taking it more seriously in the next couple of months and any help would be appreciated. Thanks!
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 05 August 2012 - 09:30 AM

Brian;
there really isn't any "camera of choice," overall - rather I would say most of us approach it as to which camera is most appropriate and realistic for any given job. I could be shooting 35mm 3 perf one day, and vDSLR the next, depending on the given job's requirements, for example.
However, should you wish to purchase your own camera (which I generally advise against due problems of obsolescence) I would look more towards vDSLRs and some lenses. I have a particular soft spot for the Canon 60D with Leica R Primes, but that is primarily because I am on a web-series with it and have gotten accustomed to how it looks and how best to work with it.

I would also look around in your area to see what people near you are looking to shoot on, or looking to shoot with. Chances are it'll be DSLR, but if you see a lot of gigs asking for 7Ds or 5Ds or FS700s, then you should err towards them as they might at least make you some money as a rental item.
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#3 Brian Mead

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Posted 05 August 2012 - 09:54 AM

Hey, thanks for the quick reply!

All of the shooting I would be doing in the near future would be for my own personal videos/youtube channel(maybe some competitions), not really working "for" someone per-say, where the object is to get a paycheck, I'm merely looking to get into the hobby of video-shooting and later down the line take it more seriously..and my cellphone wasn't really cutting it..haha

Judging from your reply though, rental seems like a logical short-term idea because of the variety of cams to use like you said would vary with the job, but the prices around me seem kind of steep, (2-day rental ~$100) so I'm not sure if I should just go for it and get a camera or learn whilst renting. I'll check out the 60D and do some research on it though. I was hoping to spend under $2000 to get everything I needed(tripod, perhaps a moving/rolling one) and lenses and stuff. Pretty risky to just jump into all this but I figure I'm young and I should spend my money on something I could get enjoyment out of

The reason I wanted to purchase a nice camera is because I wanted to be able to get a professional looking shot and not be held back by a lack of gear. I figure after I get the tools, I'll be able to set the shot how I want it lighting/lenses and such and not be fumbling around realizing I need one thing, don't need another, etc..

Also, this is all a learning experience for me. I just don't want to make the wrong move and waste money or anything so I will weigh all opinions
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 05 August 2012 - 10:01 AM

For learning, ect, I kinda of do support the vDslrs, and you should hit your 2K price point with them (look for a used on on BH photo for example).
I like them because, well you can shoot video with them, yes, change out lenses, ect and when all is said and done, you'll have a DSLR, which you can use on most sets. I don't own one myself, but I am constantly borrowing one to use to show worried clients how the shot will look (when on film).

One thing, though, is that tools will not a great shot make. They may make it easier to get what you want, and yes, sometimes you need x or y to do something. However, the professional looking shots all come, primarily, from the professional behind the camera. I'm not saying this to discourage you, rather, just to say, don't go getting gear lust thinking it's a cure all. The only gear you really need to make beautiful images is your own sensibilities which will develop over time.
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#5 Brian Mead

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Posted 05 August 2012 - 10:46 AM

Thanks ! Before I was kind of blindly looking at cameras online not really sure of what direction to go but this definitely helps.

I understand that it's the cameraman and not the camera though. After all many great movies in the past obviously didn't have the best cameras filming them! I checked out your site though, and your reel on it, and it's a sure that you know what you're talking about! I've been producing music a little more seriously the past 2yrs and I feel as if a camera is the next step to doing my own work. The music thing..well that took time haha, and a lot of dedication and I'm still not a professional, but entry-level, so I know what kind of hours it takes to really get good at something. At least now, I have an idea of what I will need to make it all happen. Thanks for the info! Good vibes your way!
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 05 August 2012 - 10:55 AM

Thanks Brian (and glad you liked the reel).
Also, something great to develop, for film, as with music, is your eye. Just look at how lighting is effecting things, and note where the light is coming from. It can be as simple as looking at the light on people's faces as a subway train rolls slowly down the track; or when outside looking at people and how they look in relation to where the sun is- - things like this.
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#7 Brian Mead

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Posted 05 August 2012 - 01:37 PM

Hey Adrian, sorry to keep coming at you with these questions, but I've found a possible purchase and I just want to make sure if I'm headed in the right direction;

Canon EOS 60D DSLR Camera (Body Only)
Leica Zoom Wide Angle-Telephoto 35-70mm f/3.5 Vario-Elmar R Manual Focus

I'm trying to get something quality-wise along the lines of this video; -- Lots of movement going on at times/others still/close-ups

I know that's the 7D but I'm not sure if I chose the right lense, confused if I should go with the 35-70 or a different size
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#8 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 05 August 2012 - 01:46 PM

They're using a rather wide lens for a good deal of their shots, a well as a steadycam and color correction.
For now, just stick with the stock zoom. Test it out, get a feel for the camera, and then start picking up other lenses. Don't buy the whole farm at once, you may find you don't like wide-angle shots, or that you really like them, and from there you can start experimenting with other things.
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#9 Nicolas Gomez

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 09:42 PM

There are many places where a good DSLR is considered professional, I´d say that the trick is knowing how to use the camera properly more than the camera itself. We work a lot with 5Ds here in Colombia and they are considered fully professional as film cameras. We get to see a lot of films in cinemas done with 5Ds. Its all about the cinematographer.

http://www.elsotano.com.co
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS