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Choosing Film


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#1 Alex James

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 06:25 AM

Hi Guys,

I am new to shooting film, only shot digital.

I would like some more info about stocks what are popular and good etc.

And also what film stock to choose normally ?

Is there any info online?

Thanks
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#2 Phil Thompson

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 06:51 AM

Making a good move shooting on film. You will have lush footage that you'll never be embarrassed having in your show-reel as opposed to saving a couple of hundred quid and having some pikey Mini-Dv rubbish..

Good move.

16mm - Fuji stock is cheap - and they do good discounts. Give them a buzz.

Sometimes they have cheap stock on here. ( I spy 64D at the mo in 400ft loads) 25 quid tho! Bargain.

I have some 16mm and would happily send you a can of 400ft for free. You can get it cup up to 100ft loads in the lab if u need. Let me know.

Also you can hustle Fuji and say you wanna test there 16mm stock. They will send you one for free!

http://www.filmstockclearance.com/

Me - I love the Vivid 160T with filter.
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#3 Alex James

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 07:01 AM

Thanks Phil,

I heard the Eterna stock is great?

What about the Kodak Stock?

What is popular stock I am a complete newbee when it comes to film. Only shot 35mm stills film such as velvia, ektar etc

Thanks
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 07:22 AM

I am not really a fan of Fuji stocks. I often find them a bit too grainy for my tastes..
You will find that with film stocks, it often really is a mater of tastes. And for me, at least in S16mm, I've never really been happy with my results on Fuji.

I suppose that makes me primarily a Kodak man. Stocks like '19 are really fantastic (though I'm not so keen on their new '30) and I can tell you I could do a whole movie with just 5213 and not worry too much about any situation.


In truth, though, you'll be picking your stocks based on the look you want as well as what you are shooting. Something like 500T is great for night exts and all interiors, but the problem is once you're trying to shoot in a desert of something at high noon by the time you stack all the ND in the matte box you won't be able to really see through the viewfinder! So in that regards your choice is kind of a function of what the scene is.

Something like Fuji Vivid, for example, is great in my opinion for nice urban environments when you want a slicker look, but It probably isn't what I would be reaching for when it comes to shooting pastels.... For that I'd go Eterna.

One of the very nice things about Kodak and Fuji, however, is they'll often send you a roll or two for testing for free. I'm not sure where you are, but if you're on the east coast of US I can give you a good friend of mine @ Kodak who can help you out and probably get you some test loads.

On the Fuji side, since I don't shoot too much of it I don't know any direct contacts, but you can just drop them a line.

There is a lot of information on both their websites, though, on their film, and Kodak, at least has some youtube examples of their stocks (though it's youtube... so not particularly representative of how it really looks... it's enough to wet your apatite a bit and at least see situations in which people are using a certain stock.)

http://www.youtube.c...99&feature=plcp

Also, if you happen to read American Cinematographer, which you really should, they'll often detail why a DoP is choosing a certain stock (though sadly not so much so anymore.) as well as listing what stocks were used on which films.

Also keep in mind, that while a film stock has a certain inherent bias what makes the most difference in how a film or a stock looks is what it is photographing. A white wall is a white wall, you know? Just using a different stock won't make it purple, lets say.

Hope it helps.
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#5 Paul Bartok

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 09:12 AM

I am not really a fan of Fuji stocks. I often find them a bit too grainy for my tastes..
You will find that with film stocks, it often really is a mater of tastes. And for me, at least in S16mm, I've never really been happy with my results on Fuji.

I suppose that makes me primarily a Kodak man. Stocks like '19 are really fantastic (though I'm not so keen on their new '30) and I can tell you I could do a whole movie with just 5213 and not worry too much about any situation.


Totally agree with all of that, I think you cant go wrong with 5219 and 5207, Depending of your budget I recommend buying short ends and recans to save lots of money, you should usually be able to locate a dealer somewhere in your city or country.

http://motion.kodak...._Films/5207.htm

http://motion.kodak...._Films/5219.htm
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 09:19 AM

One of these days, Paul, I keep promising myself I'll use "D" stocks. Though honestly, to this date I've only ever rolled F64 from Fuji and some '05 from Kodak. I guess it's always a function of never knowing what to expect and trying to minimize "leftovers,"- and perhaps because it's just what I like-- but I tend to roll '17 (or '13 now) when in D-EXTs through something like an 81EFN.3.

While I'm thinking of it too, does Fuji still make Reala 500D? If so, man, that's a stock I'd love to play with for INT shots... and embrace the mis-balance.
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#7 John Holland

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 12:13 PM

And for me there is only Fuji great range of stocks that still look like film . Their Vivid Stocks are fantastic . Kodak lost the plot years ago trying and managing to make their stocks looking like Video !
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#8 Mike Lary

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Posted 16 August 2012 - 09:39 PM

If you have the budget for experimentation you can purchase short ends (leftover film from productions in varying lengths sold at a discount), then shoot in different environments (day, night, artificial light, etc). This will give you a general idea what to expect from different emulsions. I've found it's easy to get Kodak short ends, but Fuji is more difficult. If you're shooting 16 or Super16 you'll find a world of difference between slower emulsions and faster emulsions grain-wise. Personally, I prefer Fuji's look if there isn't much budget for grading. If you plan on spending a lot of time (and $) in a professional grading suite, your choice of stock as a beginner isn't going to make much difference.
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