Jump to content


Photo

Visible lightrays


  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Nicklas Glad

Nicklas Glad

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 20 August 2012 - 04:16 PM

Hi everone, I am about to shoot a scene where many small shafts of light are supposed to become visible and I was wondering what is best to use? Smoke, haze or something completely different? I have worked alot with smoke in musicvideos, but I think that smoke is too textured, it's really obvious that it's smoke. I would like the lightrays to look like this shot from Minority Report.

Minority Report.jpg

Best, Nicklas
  • 0

#2 Karl Eklund

Karl Eklund
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 37 posts
  • Student

Posted 20 August 2012 - 06:10 PM

Hi everone, I am about to shoot a scene where many small shafts of light are supposed to become visible and I was wondering what is best to use? Smoke, haze or something completely different? I have worked alot with smoke in musicvideos, but I think that smoke is too textured, it's really obvious that it's smoke. I would like the lightrays to look like this shot from Minority Report.

Minority Report.jpg

Best, Nicklas

That is probably smoke.

The key is just to spread it out in the room, and let it settle a bit.
  • 0

#3 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 20 August 2012 - 09:04 PM

If it that look only that you're after and don't want to have to think too much get a hazer.
  • 0

#4 Oliver Hadlow Martin

Oliver Hadlow Martin
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 102 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera
  • UK

Posted 21 August 2012 - 07:01 PM

Those rays look really pronounced, looks more like smoke.




Let it settle and fan it around the room with a clip board or something.


  • 0

#5 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 22 August 2012 - 01:24 AM

We just let the haze build up - not the best tactic in a room with air con though ...

But yeh, either will work
  • 0

#6 Kevin Horn

Kevin Horn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 15 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Saint Paul, Minnesota

Posted 23 August 2012 - 09:59 PM

In my experience hazers tend to work the best because the haze doesn't dissipate as quickly as smoke machines. What I usually do is run the machine in between takes, roll camera and call action when the smoke looks perfect.

I'd say the biggest reason why these rays are so pronounced is the units used outside the windows. They're seemingly larger units with either a fresnel lens or possibly no lens at all, getting the sharpest ray possible. The best haze I've ever seen is in Blade Runner. It's pure atmosphere, stylized yes, but it's not trying to be all that subtle about it.
  • 0


Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Opal

Metropolis Post

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

CineTape

Abel Cine

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Technodolly

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Wooden Camera

Paralinx LLC

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

CineLab

Opal

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Willys Widgets

Technodolly

CineTape

Abel Cine

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Glidecam

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

The Slider

Wooden Camera

Ritter Battery