Jump to content


Photo

Film that's been left out for a year


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 M Joel W

M Joel W
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 268 posts
  • Student

Posted 26 August 2012 - 10:44 PM

I might be able to get my hands on some 5230 and a 35mm camera for less money than they would usually cost to use, but my concern is that the film has been left out for a year in normal temperatures (an office that varies between 40ºF and 90ºF, but is usually more temperate, is my guess).

Should I:

a) Refrigerate the stock now and take it out when I'm ready to use it (hopefully within a year or two).

B ) Not bother.

c) Continue to leave it out in the same environment.

and if I choose to use it should I:

a) Rate it significantly slower (250ISO) and expect major color shifts or

B ) Rate it the same and expect it will be very similar to how it was originally or

c) Try it out and see what it's like

Basically what I'm asking is--how bad will this film be and how should I treat it so it doesn't get worse?

Thanks!

Edited by M Joel W, 26 August 2012 - 10:44 PM.

  • 0

#2 Robert Houllahan

Robert Houllahan
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1584 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Providence R.I.

Posted 27 August 2012 - 09:26 AM

The film will probably be fine, it depends on how hot it got and how often if you really want to know you could have the lab do a clip test for you.

-Rob-
  • 0

#3 Will Montgomery

Will Montgomery
  • Sustaining Members
  • 2030 posts
  • Producer
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 27 August 2012 - 10:51 AM

Most colorists I work with have never met a film they can't fix or at least work with. Even if the snip test says it's off, try a shooting test and have your telecine guy play with it. Chances are it will be fine.
  • 0

#4 M Joel W

M Joel W
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 268 posts
  • Student

Posted 27 August 2012 - 11:04 AM

Thanks! If I might not use it for as long as a year, should I store it in a refrigerator or just leave it out in the same conditions?

Thankfully this wouldn't be for a commercial project.
  • 0

#5 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3071 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 27 August 2012 - 11:34 AM

Refrigerate it now, or freeze it if you are not going to use it for a year or so.
  • 0

#6 Robert Houllahan

Robert Houllahan
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1584 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Providence R.I.

Posted 29 August 2012 - 10:22 AM

I have had some 1000' cans of 5229 for four years now, slowly using them up and I have kept them in a refrigerator meant for wine cooling. I just developed 1500' for a project I am working on and the film looks as good as it did when i got it. I would not freeze the film just keep it in a cold fridge and you will be fine.

-Rob-
  • 0

#7 Charles MacDonald

Charles MacDonald
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1157 posts
  • Other
  • Stittsville Ontario Canada

Posted 29 August 2012 - 01:16 PM

freeze it if you are not going to use it for a year or so.


I have heard folks who have reason to know, questioning freezing film that has been opened. The trick is that if the humidity has caused the film to absorb moisture, it might be dammaged by the formation of Ice Crystals. If it is still factory sealed, and if the data sheet for that particular stock specifies that freezing is permited then you would be OK. Refrigerator temperatures are typicality around 4C which is the point where Water has the greatest density.
  • 0

#8 M Joel W

M Joel W
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 268 posts
  • Student

Posted 30 August 2012 - 07:19 PM

Thank you all. I'll see if I can refrigerate it until I use it.
  • 0

#9 Indiefilmstock

Indiefilmstock
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts
  • Other

Posted 31 August 2012 - 05:53 PM

I guess the key question is what does "left out" mean. 5230 is a 500T and the faster the film, the shorter the shelf life. However, if it has been kept in an relatively cool space, it should be good to use. A snip test at a lab can confirm that.

When you say you can get your hands on some 5230 that would be less money than usual, how much is the cost? I've got a vault of film that has not been left out and is current. Some of it is factory sealed and some of it is ends and recans.

Richard Kaufman
Comtel Pro Media
richard@comtelpm.com
818-450-1122
  • 0

#10 M Joel W

M Joel W
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 268 posts
  • Student

Posted 01 September 2012 - 07:26 PM

It's been exactly a year so if we refrigerate it now I figure it will still be good in a year, maybe? Or I can try to use it sooner. I'll get a snip test.

I don't have a claim on this film yet, but if I get my hands on it it should be almost free for quite a lot of film, which is why I'm interested in the first place. Of course processing won't be free. It's the remains from a feature shot on 35mm and the studio couldn't sell it because it was left out. I might also have some Fuji 64D from a short made under similar circumstances, come to think of it.

Edited by M Joel W, 01 September 2012 - 07:27 PM.

  • 0

#11 Indiefilmstock

Indiefilmstock
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts
  • Other

Posted 01 September 2012 - 10:25 PM

It may still be good in a year...maybe. The good news is that it is all from same source. So, you really don't need to test every can. Just test a couple since you can assume it was all stored in same place under similar conditions and purchased roughly at same date.

Free is good! I'm guessing though that the studio could not sell it because the after market for 5230 is basically non existant. Kodak created the film as a lower cost alternative to the 5219 for indies and tv movies. But, most filmmakers would rather shoot on 5219 for a 500T. Snow White, however, with Charlize Theron was shot on it so some filmmakers like it.

If you need more, please give me a call.

Richard Kaufman
Comtel Pro Media
richard@comtelpm.com
  • 0


Metropolis Post

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

Glidecam

CineTape

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Opal

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Visual Products

Wooden Camera

rebotnix Technologies

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Ritter Battery

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Opal

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Technodolly

rebotnix Technologies

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC