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Connecting Speed Rail for a Dana Dolly or CamTram


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#1 James Leonzio

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Posted 29 August 2012 - 10:50 PM

Hi,

I'm trying to figure out the best dolly/slider solution for my specific application. I need to be extremely mobile (be able to transport my gear in the trunk of a NYC cab). As far as track goes, I think 4' is about as long I can go without having issues.

So, in order to do a fairly decent length dolly move, I'll need to find a way to connect speed rail in a fairly precise way, so that when the slider goes between two sections of track, there wont be a bump.

Anyone out there figure out a way to connect multiple sections of speed rail for this purpose?
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#2 Sanjay Sami

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 06:44 AM

Hi,

I'm trying to figure out the best dolly/slider solution for my specific application. I need to be extremely mobile (be able to transport my gear in the trunk of a NYC cab). As far as track goes, I think 4' is about as long I can go without having issues.

So, in order to do a fairly decent length dolly move, I'll need to find a way to connect speed rail in a fairly precise way, so that when the slider goes between two sections of track, there wont be a bump.

Anyone out there figure out a way to connect multiple sections of speed rail for this purpose?


You are not going to be able to make speed rail completely bump free. Get 4 foot sections of precision track and take out the cross pieces so that they occupy only 4 foot. If you get Panther stainless precision track, the sleepers can be bolted on very quickly. They join with latches on the I-beam part of the track. Very smooth.
Panther makes a 1 metre track. 4 foot would be a special order.
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#3 Travis Gray

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 07:36 AM

I haven't done this specific thing yet, but the Dana Dolly is decent at handling minor track issues, and I use electrical conduit for pipe. They do make connectors that you can join two ends together with a minor seam between them, and I think the Dana could handle it decently.


From the Dana Dolly site:

What if you want to splice the pipe together to make longer runs? Several companies make splicers. Wagner : http://www.wagnercom..._Connector.aspx
The Light Source: http://www.thelights...roducts/36/view
Hollaender: http://www.hollaende...fm?page=splices
are three different types of splices. If you use a splice, I would suggest coating the two ends of the pipe to be spliced with a little silicone caulk the day before, and let it dry. When you join the two pipe ends, just snug them up a little so the silicone fills the gap between the two pipes and helps take out the bump.


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#4 James Leonzio

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 11:55 AM

Very Cool, Travis.

Just judging from the pictures and descriptions, I like the Mega-Quick Pipe Splice. Seems to be really easy to connect, disconnect, and fairly strong. I think with a little silicone, or maybe some fine grit sanding at the joints, I can put something together pretty sweet.

to the BatLab for testing...

thanks guys!
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#5 Travis Gray

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 01:10 PM

Very Cool, Travis.

Just judging from the pictures and descriptions, I like the Mega-Quick Pipe Splice. Seems to be really easy to connect, disconnect, and fairly strong. I think with a little silicone, or maybe some fine grit sanding at the joints, I can put something together pretty sweet.

to the BatLab for testing...

thanks guys!



Definitely use the support piece for any part with a splice. Just to give it that extra support. Or some kind of support. Not sure how it'd be if you put 4' and 4' together. Haven't tried my 10' length of pipe yet. Bought it for a shoot and never pulled it out. But 5' by itself doesn't bow too much/at all. It think the splicers would hold it together fine without fear of them falling out, especially if both ends are well supported and stabilized, but I'd be more worried about bowing at the connection if anything.
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#6 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 06 September 2012 - 11:47 PM

It seems less an equipment issue than a transpo issue.
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#7 Jon Rosenbloom

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Posted 10 September 2012 - 10:41 AM

What I mean by my sarcasm is that there's a base level of production infrastructure that you have to accept. The way to move a camera smoothly over 16' of sidewalk is to put some kind of dolly on 20' of level dolly track. If you jump out of your cab and connect 10 4' pipes, and then lay them into your six custom jigged railroad ties, then you've just spent 4 times the amount of time it would take you to lay out two 8's and a 4' of actual track that you can transport on a roof rack or in a station wagon. The extra set-up and break down effort makes you less mobile. Is that how you want to spend your shooting day?
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