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Minolta xl 84


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#1 Viktor Gibarti

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 12:33 PM

Hi All,

Dose anyone know how can i adjust the light meter automatik for ekatchrome 100d on this camera?


Thanks!
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#2 Zac Fettig

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Posted 30 August 2012 - 02:34 PM

Hi All,

Dose anyone know how can i adjust the light meter automatik for ekatchrome 100d on this camera?


Thanks!


Hi,

http://www.cinematog...showtopic=52598

This link should be helpful.

It says you'll need to bump the exposure 2/3 of a stop, with the aperture. So set it 2/3 of a stop wider.
-Zac

Edited by Zac Fettig, 30 August 2012 - 02:37 PM.

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#3 Viktor Gibarti

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Posted 31 August 2012 - 01:24 PM

Thanks Zac,

you are very kind...

But it is working in just manual settings.... i would like to use the automatic light meter with 100d. Need to be adjust inside the camera...

Regards,
Viktor
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#4 Zac Fettig

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Posted 31 August 2012 - 01:54 PM

Thanks Zac,

you are very kind...

But it is working in just manual settings.... i would like to use the automatic light meter with 100d. Need to be adjust inside the camera...

Regards,
Viktor


That camera meters for ISO 40 or ISO 160. It should read ISO 100 film as ISO 160. The camera will expose it out a bit dark (2/3 of a stop), but the meter should work. It's within the film's latitude. The link below is a film clip for uncorrected 100D in a similar camera to yours, shot in daylight, with the automatic meter.



It should look like that. But you'll have to shoot a test roll to know for sure. Note that this film was shot 24 fps.

Edited by Zac Fettig, 31 August 2012 - 01:55 PM.

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#5 Viktor Gibarti

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Posted 02 September 2012 - 01:39 AM

Thanks Zac,

I know this video....but i would liket to adjust my camera lightmeter automatic... for the accurate exposing...

Thanks again!

Viktor
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#6 Zac Fettig

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Posted 02 September 2012 - 06:33 PM

Thanks Zac,

I know this video....but i would liket to adjust my camera lightmeter automatic... for the accurate exposing...

Thanks again!

Viktor


Just make sure the automatic exposure control switch (on the right side of the camera above the lens and rearward of the macro switch) is set to Auto. It will automatically meter then.

You can find a manual here:
http://www.super8aid.net/cameras.html

You will need to create an account.

If you're not sure, run a test film before you shoot anything important. Here, in the US, a roll of tri-x is about $13.50 and developing it is about $15.
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#7 Viktor Gibarti

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 12:27 AM

Thanks Zac,

I have 3 minolta xl 84 camera and i love them...:) I know how is working the light meter in manual and automatic. I have to just know how can i adjust INSIDE the lighmeter automatic for the 100D. i think need a repair manual for this camera..

regards and thanks again,
Vik
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#8 Zac Fettig

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Posted 03 September 2012 - 01:35 PM

Thanks Zac,

I have 3 minolta xl 84 camera and i love them...:) I know how is working the light meter in manual and automatic. I have to just know how can i adjust INSIDE the lighmeter automatic for the 100D. i think need a repair manual for this camera..

regards and thanks again,
Vik


The camera only meters ISO 40 and ISO 160. You can't meter inside the camera for 100 exactly. If you put a film cartridge in, it'll read it as 160. It'll be slightly overexposed, by 2/3 of a stop, but it will work just fine.

If you turn the internal daylight filter on it will be close. Since 160, which the camera will read the film as, is +2/3 of a stop and the filter is -2/3 stop. I don't believe that camera automatically adjusts for tungsten/daylight film.

If you're talking about tearing the camera down to adjust the built in lightmeter, I wouldn't bother. It'll be a huge pain, unless you've rebuilt cameras and lightmeters before. It would be MUCH easier to just use an external lightmeter, and you'll get much better results. Or buy a camera that can read more types of film. A Canon 814 Auto Zoom Electronic can be had for under $50 if you look. The Minolta is nice, but not so nice I'd pour that much time money and effort into, unless it has sentimental value. It's not a Leicina or a Zeiss, by any stretch.

Even if you were successful, it would be only an averaged reading at best. Keep in mind, it's a 30 year old camera with a 30 year old lightmeter.

If you're determined to do it, here's how I would do it.
Set up a calibrated lit target. Put in a dummy load of film, corrected to ISO 100. Point the camera at the target, and measure the light meter response. Write it down. Add 2/3 of a stop to the aperture value (2/3 of a stop smaller). This is your goal.

I'd find the resistor attached to the lightmeter sensor and replace the resistor wired to it with a potentiometer. Adjust the potentiometer until it matches your goal. Remove the potentiometer from the circuit, and measure it's value, WITHOUT turning the knob. Wire in a resistor with that value into the circuit.

NOTE: Make sure that NO light is bleeding into the sensor while you adjust it. It's a TTL camera, so all the light must be coming from the lens.

Close the camera, and shoot a test roll to make sure everything went according to plan.

Keep in mind, a LOT can go wrong here. If you can find a service manual, that's the best approach. But they'll be hard to get a hold of these days.

I personally don't think it's worth it for 2/3 of a stop adjustment. Especially when the camera handles manual aperture control so well, and the Auto meter is lackluster to begin with.
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#9 Viktor Gibarti

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Posted 04 September 2012 - 01:34 AM

The camera only meters ISO 40 and ISO 160. You can't meter inside the camera for 100 exactly. If you put a film cartridge in, it'll read it as 160. It'll be slightly overexposed, by 2/3 of a stop, but it will work just fine.

If you turn the internal daylight filter on it will be close. Since 160, which the camera will read the film as, is +2/3 of a stop and the filter is -2/3 stop. I don't believe that camera automatically adjusts for tungsten/daylight film.

If you're talking about tearing the camera down to adjust the built in lightmeter, I wouldn't bother. It'll be a huge pain, unless you've rebuilt cameras and lightmeters before. It would be MUCH easier to just use an external lightmeter, and you'll get much better results. Or buy a camera that can read more types of film. A Canon 814 Auto Zoom Electronic can be had for under $50 if you look. The Minolta is nice, but not so nice I'd pour that much time money and effort into, unless it has sentimental value. It's not a Leicina or a Zeiss, by any stretch.

Even if you were successful, it would be only an averaged reading at best. Keep in mind, it's a 30 year old camera with a 30 year old lightmeter.

If you're determined to do it, here's how I would do it.
Set up a calibrated lit target. Put in a dummy load of film, corrected to ISO 100. Point the camera at the target, and measure the light meter response. Write it down. Add 2/3 of a stop to the aperture value (2/3 of a stop smaller). This is your goal.

I'd find the resistor attached to the lightmeter sensor and replace the resistor wired to it with a potentiometer. Adjust the potentiometer until it matches your goal. Remove the potentiometer from the circuit, and measure it's value, WITHOUT turning the knob. Wire in a resistor with that value into the circuit.

NOTE: Make sure that NO light is bleeding into the sensor while you adjust it. It's a TTL camera, so all the light must be coming from the lens.

Close the camera, and shoot a test roll to make sure everything went according to plan.

Keep in mind, a LOT can go wrong here. If you can find a service manual, that's the best approach. But they'll be hard to get a hold of these days.

I personally don't think it's worth it for 2/3 of a stop adjustment. Especially when the camera handles manual aperture control so well, and the Auto meter is lackluster to begin with.





Thanks again Zac,

I could find a service manual for this camera and i know how adjust the light meter...it posseible a small (potmeter) inside the camera... sorry for my english...

I have 62 camera!!!! Including Leicina special, Beaulieu 6008 pro, nikon r10, Zeiss moviflex, nizo, Bauer, elmo, many, many others.... But for me the minolta xl 84 is good low light camera....the lens is pretty good...

And now I have got a Minolta xl 84 what read the ektachrome 100d film..

regards
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Ritter Battery

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FJS International, LLC

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

Tai Audio

CineLab

CineTape

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Glidecam

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Rig Wheels Passport

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Technodolly

Metropolis Post