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Help Choosing First Camera


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#1 Dillon Bye

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 05:46 PM

Hey guys, I'm new here. So I'll definitely have a lot of questions, so bear with me! Anyway in a few short months I'll be starring and directing in a film I've written. I understand there is 'no best camera' but I'm just looking for the best advice on which camera to choose. Along with what I mentioned earlier, I'll also be the primary cinematographer (if that's the correct term). I want an authentic film quality, however going the way of 35mm seems like it could be an issue; seeing as I've never worked a professional camera before. So I've been straying towards the RED Scarlet-X and the new Sony A99. I understand they're both very different cameras and would love for someone to give the pros/cons of each. I'm looking for a dark tone to my film, something like The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo and beautiful outdoor shots like in Hanna. So really which camera would better suit me? Or should I look into renting a film camera?

Thanks ahead of time! Any help would be appreciated!

Edited by Dillon Bye, 14 September 2012 - 05:47 PM.

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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 14 September 2012 - 07:04 PM

With all due respect, and I do mean that, you would be much better off getting together with a cinematographer to bring your film to the screen. Unless you really know what you're up to, you'll be pissing a lot of money away on a camera you can't get to look good. It takes equal amounts skill and talent to really bring a film to life, and the visuals are such a vital part of that. Look for people just getting started in the industry but one who seems knowledgeable and who you get along with who can help you pick the appropriate camera for your vision, style, and budget.

Also, I would argue film is much easier to get good images on that a digital camera-- primarily because I find it captures and stores those images much better than any digital camera I've seen.
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#3 Dillon Bye

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Posted 16 September 2012 - 09:28 AM

Thanks! I appreciate your insight! I'll look into someone who really knows what they're doing! Weighing my options though, what are some good film cameras to use? I've tried doing a little bit of research, but I have been having a difficult time finding something suitable for me. Also I know 35mm is the standard formant, but do you require a camera that has the ability to shoot that?

Thanks!
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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Opal

Technodolly

Tai Audio

Metropolis Post

Visual Products

The Slider

FJS International, LLC

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rebotnix Technologies

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineTape

Rig Wheels Passport