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Identifying 35mm Film


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#1 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 30 September 2012 - 03:45 AM

I know some of you are interested in the world of film archiving so I thought you might be interested in an aid I have devised to assist in the identification of 35mm film. It is a PDF file with hyperlinks to assist you in the identification process. I do not guarantee that it is complete or 100% accurate but it is designed to help those who have just started in this field or are perhaps less technical. I am happy to receive comments or corrections.
You will find the file here where you can download it:

www.brianpritchard.com/IMPF.html

You also might find this of interest:

www.brianpritchard.com/Eastman_Duplicating_Film_1927.htm

It is a booklet produced in 1927 by the Eastman Kodak Company when they first introduced duplicating stocks. It is also when D76 was first introduced.

Brian
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#2 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 05:29 PM

This is a stunningly comprehensive document! Well done. quite the resource.
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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 02 October 2012 - 07:05 PM

You know, I don't think I'll ever really find myself in a situation needing this flowchart, but it is so damned interesting to go through. Also, man, Brian, awesomely useful site you have. Thanks
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#4 Mark Dunn

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 04:49 AM

Can we have more on Viscalar? There's nothing else out there.
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#5 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 03 October 2012 - 03:31 PM

Can we have more on Viscalar? There's nothing else out there.


I have seen some as Microfilm. It is kinda interesting as it looks like something old faded and bunded out to see, but gives a clear image. I would also like to ask brian if There was any use of Diazo in movies. Diazo is commonly used to make working copies of Microfilm, as it is more durable phyicaly than silver film and is also quite inexpensive. Diazo might fade badly as a projection print, but should work well in intermediate roles as a low loss, low cost direct duplicate.
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#6 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 07:23 AM

I have seen some as Microfilm. It is kinda interesting as it looks like something old faded and bunded out to see, but gives a clear image. I would also like to ask brian if There was any use of Diazo in movies. Diazo is commonly used to make working copies of Microfilm, as it is more durable phyicaly than silver film and is also quite inexpensive. Diazo might fade badly as a projection print, but should work well in intermediate roles as a low loss, low cost direct duplicate.


I have to admit I have never heard of Diazo being used in Motion Picture, doesn't mean it it didn't happen.
Viscalar film was fairly regularly used to make Academy leaders, as Charles says, visually there doesn't appear to be any density to the image but when printed or projected the density appears.

Brian
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#7 Paul Bartok

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Posted 04 October 2012 - 04:21 PM

More on agfa please :)
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#8 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 21 January 2013 - 01:59 AM

I have made some small amendments to my 35mm Film Identification PDF and also added a similar tool for 16mm. you will find them here
:http://www.brianpritchard.com/IMPF.htm

if you find any errors or have any suggestions then please email me.
Thanks
Brian
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rebotnix Technologies

Technodolly

Aerial Filmworks

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Opal

FJS International, LLC

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

CineTape

Ritter Battery

Paralinx LLC

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Visual Products

CineLab

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

Glidecam