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How do you put together a shot list?


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#1 Nathan Kelley

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 10:22 AM

Hey i was just wondering how some people go about putting together a shot list once you have read the script? Looking to see if people have any differences when it comes to planning out your shots.
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#2 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 12:36 PM

I'd look at the locations before putting together a shot list, otherwise you could be into a fantasy film that only exists in your head.
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#3 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 12:42 PM

I'd look at the locations before putting together a shot list, otherwise you could be into a fantasy film that only exists in your head.


I'd storyboard it first. Then try to find the locations that match what you have in your mind as closely as possible. Then I'd do the shot list.
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#4 Freya Black

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Posted 05 October 2012 - 02:28 PM

I'd storyboard it first. Then try to find the locations that match what you have in your mind as closely as possible. Then I'd do the shot list.


If you have the luxury of decent location scouting and you are storyboarding, then I would DEFINITELY do the location scout first. That way if you find something amazing or cool in the location scouting you can work it into your storyboarding. Of course the storyboards are just a guide anyway, but if you are going to the trouble why not check the places out first. That way you might be able to keep closer to the storyboard rather than having to just throw all that work away when you get there!

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#5 Lisa Talley

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 06:12 PM

While working on a senior film in college, I made a shot list without seeing the location first for one of the scenes. The location was locked down last minute and there was no time for me to go study it. I thought I would be all right since I was able to Google the apartment complex's unit layouts... When we arrived there, my shot list went out the window. It looked nothing like what I had seen, which was due to furniture layout and the images of the units possibly being out of date. I ended up calling shots on the fly... it wasn't a total disaster since I had already planned out what I wanted the scene to look like. ANY pre-production is better than none.

If you can scout and actually see the location, awesome, do that. If you can't, well... storyboard at least what you want the scene to look like. You can modify it as you need to when you get to the location. If you're working with a DP, ask him/her what he/she prefers. Some people prefer being a part of the storyboard process, some do fine with a list i.e. shots # 1. 2. 3. 4. .. and I know one who picks up on direction on the spot day of. It all depends, but no matter what, for yourself, make an effort to story board.

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