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How do we like to expose our Vision3 film?


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#1 Mark Sperry

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Posted 15 October 2012 - 01:13 PM

In photography we have Portra 400, 160, and 800. We typically find that best results are achieved by exposing minimum of 1 stop over box speed. 2 stops when using Fuji 400H. I've been using my in-camera light meters with the negative film from pro8mm and I've so far been happy with the results. However I'd like to use my cine meter more in the future and I'm wondering if the practice of over exposing the negative films is the same for the cine stocks? I'll be shooting 250D and 500T. The 500T I might be exposing at box speed if it's dark indoors, but the 250D should be all outdoor stuff. Should I try a stop over or is it best to just stick with what Kodak says it is?

Thanks! Any tips for metering cine films would be greatly appreciated.
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#2 Matt Stevens

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 09:59 AM

For Pro8's daylight stock I have too littl experience to give a recommendation. But for 200t and even 500t Kodak I have typically gone one stop over and had fine results. I believe that is what Kodak actually recommends.
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#3 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 10:28 AM

For Pro8's daylight stock I have too littl experience to give a recommendation. But for 200t and even 500t Kodak I have typically gone one stop over and had fine results. I believe that is what Kodak actually recommends.


One stop over is the recommended compensation for negative. It depends on how you like your image. For me, one stop over is a little too light but you can always stop down in printing.
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 16 October 2012 - 10:31 AM

When it comes to high speed stuff, I normally go over by 2/3rds of a stop. I'd do this for any neg film of asa 400 or more. For the mid-speed 200t, especially the '13, I find I can just rate it @ 200 and get really good results. For slow speed stuff, I rate as the can says.

Normally the overexposure mitigated grain a bit, while also washing out the film slightly though it's nothing that cannot be un-done in post. Film has extraordinary highlight handling so nailing exposure isn't as big a deal as it is on digital.
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#5 Mark Sperry

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 10:04 PM

Cool. I'm going to try over exposing a bit at this weekends wedding.
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