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Which Lightmeter app for the iPhone?


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#1 Matt Stevens

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Posted 18 October 2012 - 02:57 PM

I read this comment earlier...

Download a light meter app for your iPhone that has a cine setting. Frame rate affects aperture setting. Better to buy a real cine light meter but they are really expensive.


Okay, cool. So which one is good? I use both a Canon 1014 XL-S and the Nikon R10 and no doubt neither's light meter is all that accurate in low light. At times the meters have been completely in the red, yet I knew we had to be at least at 1.4, or maybe even a half stop more. I took the shot and found later I was right.

How wonderful it would be to have an app on my iPod Touch or new iPhone that allowed me check against the Super8's meter.

Normally I shoot by feel. I am really not all that versed on shutter angles, etc. Here is some information on my cameras...

R10
Shutter opening angle: 160º variable shutter; positions: 0º, 40º, 80º and 160º


1014 XL-S
150 deg or 220 deg shutter angles


I would love to have a fairly simple light meter that would allow me to use settings like those of my cameras. :)
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#2 MagicalRealismFilms

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Posted 24 October 2012 - 10:18 PM

I would love to have a fairly simple light meter that would allow me to use settings like those of my cameras. :)

I'm not an expert cinematographer, but
I am guessing no one answered because the iPhone doesn't have the hardware capability to accurately measure light.

LIght meters typically have a small globe about an inch or more in diameter to sense multidirectional light
The iPhone may have a pretty good camera, but it is just a point source sensor.
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#3 Chris Millar

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 01:09 AM

Point source sensor ?

It focuses light from a reasonably wide angle on to a multitude of sensors - each of which can be accessed, averaged and so on...

Not quite as bad as you make out ... not ideal no, but perhaps once you take into account bad metering technique by many operators then well, whatever goes ;)
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#4 Matt Stevens

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 06:05 AM

I've read that they can be fairly close. Within 1/3 to 1/2 a stop. When used to compare to the internal light meter of a Super8 camera, I'd say that's fine.
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#5 Travis Gray

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 08:09 AM

I have one that's just called "Light Meter". Not the greatest thing in the world, but I've tested it against on camera meters and has been pretty accurate. Sometimes it's pretty off, but I got the best results using a grey card.
The meter area is kinda big, so hard to really pick a good spot.

No shutter angles, but does have 1/48 built in there so you could at least look at 180º.

It's not something I would necessarily rely on unless in a pinch.
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#6 Matt Stevens

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 09:13 AM

Lightmeter or Light Meter? I don't see Light Meter.

There are: Pocket Light Meter, Light Meter Free, LightMeter by whitegoods, FotometerPro (99 cents), LightMeter ($2.99 and poor reviews).

I'd be working it exclusively with the Nikon R10 and Canon 1014 XL-S Super8 cameras.

Their shuttle angles are 160 (Nikon) and 150 and 220 (Canon).
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#7 Travis Gray

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 09:44 AM

Lightmeter or Light Meter? I don't see Light Meter.

There are: Pocket Light Meter, Light Meter Free, LightMeter by whitegoods, FotometerPro (99 cents), LightMeter ($2.99 and poor reviews).

I'd be working it exclusively with the Nikon R10 and Canon 1014 XL-S Super8 cameras.

Their shuttle angles are 160 (Nikon) and 150 and 220 (Canon).



Ah, Pocket Light Meter. I just looked at the icon and it says light meter. Now I'm hoping I didn't pay for this haha
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#8 Matt Stevens

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 09:51 AM

OK, I have that one downloaded. It unfortunately does not include shutter speeds of 1/54 and 1/58, needed for the shutter angles of 160° (Nikon R10) and 150° (Canon 1014 XL-S). I suppose I need to compensate somehow, but I've never mastered any of this math so I really don't know how.
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#9 Zac Fettig

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Posted 25 October 2012 - 03:27 PM

OK, I have that one downloaded. It unfortunately does not include shutter speeds of 1/54 and 1/58, needed for the shutter angles of 160° (Nikon R10) and 150° (Canon 1014 XL-S). I suppose I need to compensate somehow, but I've never mastered any of this math so I really don't know how.


The old standby is to bump the film speed 1/3 of a stop slower and meter for 1/48 sec. For example, put in ISO 200 film as 160. The difference between 160/360 (1/54 sec) and 150/360 (1/58 sec) will be less than your finger or eye will see. If you put the 1014 XL-S to 220 degrees, set your meter 1/3 of a stop faster than the film in your camera.

Alternatively, just meter for 1/60 at the correct film speed.
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