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Create a full reflection over glasses?

glasses reflection dramatic white anime

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#1 jeremylfreedberg

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:30 PM

The end result I need to create:

http://tvtropes.org/...aryShinyGlasses

The glared out glasses you see in a lot of animes.

I am running lighting for a film shoot and the director wants a pretty dramatic interview scene. The interviewer's face is not going to be revealed until the end of the film and until then, his glasses will be completely covered in white reflection.

Any suggestions on how to achieve this? I cant just point big lights at him, you will most likely be able to see the edge of the lights.

Thanks!

Jeremy
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 05 November 2012 - 08:38 PM

Flat lenses in the glasses will help reduce the size of the white soft light needed to fill the frames.
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#3 Phil Soheili

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 06:08 AM

I'm not really sure if my approach could be working because I have little to no experience with green screen, but if you had those lenses replaced/covered green, you will probably avoid a lot of fuddling with huge fills that need to be white in a less than 100% reflection but still shed no light to the face underneath. (Otherwise you would be limited to always have the same light/direction/intensity). Would be curious to know what others say to the green aproach...

Saluti,
Phil

Edited by Phil Soheili, 06 November 2012 - 06:09 AM.

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#4 Phil Soheili

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 06:14 AM

You could have your talents glasses modified so they actually shine an LED's light powered by a flat cell through a diffusion behind the lenses. And the cell could be in the talents hair behind his ears or elsewhere.
The rig could be slightly uncomfortable to wear, but ...

Phil

Edited by Phil Soheili, 06 November 2012 - 06:14 AM.

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#5 Adam Brown

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Posted 06 November 2012 - 07:53 AM

What David said is the best approach. Depending on where you have your talent facing, just form a proper angle between the camera, their eyeline and the soft material.

What is your lighting package like? If you know how wide or tight the interview will be framed, as well. Just think about reflections and how they change the further away you are from a mirror. All these things will help you when you're on set and trying to determine camera position and the position of the material. If you have some muslin, you can rig it, however big you need based on your camera position and the relative movement of the interviewee. Then, based on what you need for exposure and look on your subject, just decide how to illuminate that material; whether by shooting lights through it or bouncing diffused light off of it.

Know that unless you're on a controlled soundstage where you can feasibly be surrounded by an illuminated white wall, you'll need to instruct your interviewee to be aware of the angle they turn their head. They should be pretty stiffly locked to look at the specific area in which you've rigged the material. There are pros and cons to this, depending on the nature of your interview and the person in general, but if you're worried about it looking unnaturally stiff or affecting the comfortability of the interviewee, then I'd just opt to make that area of material as large and evenly illuminated as possible.
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#6 Victor Lazaro

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Posted 07 November 2012 - 11:34 PM

The flat lens and soft diff is the way to go. This will take some prep, so check with your director if the effect is worth the work of if you can introduce the character in another way.

The backup solution is to track the classes and use VFX.
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#7 Phil Soheili

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Posted 09 November 2012 - 05:43 AM

I would probably use low reflection lenses in his glasses and "frost" the lenses from the face side (not using 'chromed' lenses). Especially if you feel comfortable with VFX, this might be already an 'advanced position' to start from.
This way the lenses will always be white or at least 'bright' instead of reflecting and mirroring all kinds of useless things (as the studio roof or the camera or the operator..) and you will only have to add the flares and stars.
Anyway, let us know how you went about it and how it came out!

Good luck!

Edited by Phil Soheili, 09 November 2012 - 05:47 AM.

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