Jump to content


Photo

Question about shooting with Ektachrome 100D on a Canon 514 XL-S

super 8 canon 514 ecktachrome 100d daylight filter

  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 Dylan Gonzalez

Dylan Gonzalez
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts
  • Student

Posted 16 November 2012 - 05:27 PM

I have never used a Super-8 camera (or film camera in general) before, but I ended up buying a Canon 514 XL-S with the case for $20 at a garage sale. I want to test it out to make sure it works and then, assuming it does, shoot a few projects on it and experiment with shooting on film. I've purchased one cartridge of Ektachrome 100D to experiment with, and it's currently zip-locked in my fridge.

I've been reading up on film cameras, film stock, and Super-8 in general. However, the one thing which I cannot figure out is what setting my camera should be switched to when dealing with daylight-balanced film. This question has already been asked on this forum a couple times, but it got conflicting answers and it left me a bit confused. The Ektachrome case itself says that you should set your camera to tungsten balance and that the cartridge will disable the internal filter. I'm wondering if this is correct.

I'd appreciate any help on the matter.
  • 0

#2 Ian Payne

Ian Payne
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 57 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 16 November 2012 - 08:16 PM

The cartridge disables, I use a 310xl and had the filter disengaged by the switch. I don't think it matters with that camera. http://www.canon.com...e=1971-1982&p=2
  • 1

#3 Matt Stevens

Matt Stevens
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 606 posts
  • Other

Posted 17 November 2012 - 07:36 AM

Ian is correct.

Fir a first time film shooter, here is the #1 mistake to avoid... Do not shoot into the sun. Make sure the sun is n the face of whoever you are shooting, otherwise they will be a black blob against a pretty background. It's all about exposure. Once you've figured that out,you can start altering exposure and shooting in tougher conditions.

Edited by Matt Stevens, 17 November 2012 - 07:36 AM.

  • 1

#4 zachary sala

zachary sala
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 17 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • chicago

Posted 17 November 2012 - 08:12 AM

with super 8 the notch's on the side of the cartridge control the asa. I always use dwayne's photo for my super 8 ektachrome, and the exposure should be right. Unlike some lower end super 8 cameras, this one has no button batteries.
best of luck, can't wait to see the footage.
  • 1

#5 Dylan Gonzalez

Dylan Gonzalez
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts
  • Student

Posted 17 November 2012 - 05:22 PM

Thanks guys. I really appreciate the help. I guess this means that I don't have to worry about it either way, so I will just leave it on tungsten-balance as per the film stock guidelines.

And thanks for the shooting tip, Matt. I've been reading about shooting on film and trying to learn more about proper exposure for film, film stock, film speed, etc, etc, since I've never done it before and don't know anything about it. The 514 XL-S has an EE Lock, so its probably going to make adjusting exposure (when I need to) all the more difficult.
  • 0

#6 Matt Stevens

Matt Stevens
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 606 posts
  • Other

Posted 18 November 2012 - 11:58 AM

The first two rolls I shot (100D, on the same day) were such a mixed bag, I am amazed any of it came out as I knew NOTHING! I was so unprepared. But when I got the footage back and was able to look at it, I knew what I had done right or wrong and had learned so much that when I shot roll #2, a Tri-X, it was simply for testing out the camera I had intended to use on a short film, the Canon 1014 XL-S. The shots were all tests on exposure underground, filter settings, etc. And it all came out as I had expected.

That gave me confidence and instead of renting the Canon for my short film (a straight8.net entry) I instead plunked down $400 on a Nikon R10 and shot the puppy without doing any additional tests.

This is the result...



Shot in sequence, all first takes.

P.S. I tried to embed but I simply cannot get it to work.

Edited by Matt Stevens, 18 November 2012 - 12:00 PM.

  • 0

#7 Dylan Gonzalez

Dylan Gonzalez
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts
  • Student

Posted 19 November 2012 - 04:17 PM

That's pretty amazing for something you shot all in sequence with only first takes and with no prior testing. It looks good - the underground scenes particularly looked great, although I'm going to avoid anything underground, high-contrast, or sihilouettes when I shoot until I'm more comfortable with Super 8. And even though its off-topic to Super 8 cinematography specifically, knowing you shot this all in-camera and in-sequence I had to go back and watch that "push" sequence again to see how the hell that worked.

Anyway, my own plans have been put on hold. I haven't been able to get my camera to work. When I opened the battery compartment, I found one of the batteries from the previous owner had corroded in there. I tried putting some new ones in, but either I didn't manage to put them in correctly or the cameras broken or the corrosion ruined the compartment - I'm going to have to clean it out and see.

Edited by Dylan Gonzalez, 19 November 2012 - 04:18 PM.

  • 0

#8 Dylan Gonzalez

Dylan Gonzalez
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts
  • Student

Posted 19 November 2012 - 05:59 PM

Nevermind. Like a doofus, I had the batteries in wrong. I need the positive-negative symbols to guide me. The camera is up and working and I'll be testing it tomorrow.
  • 0

#9 Bill Rodgers

Bill Rodgers
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 120 posts
  • Director
  • London & Brighton UK

Posted 25 November 2012 - 03:05 PM

I love using my Canon 514XL-S and AF model. Those tightly wound carts jam all the time in my 1014XL-S but have had no problems going through the 514s.

So I do hope you've had fun shooting Super 8 for the first time Dylan?



Great Straight8 entry Matt, I really love the subway scenes and your in-camera cutting was brilliant. I've entered a few times for fun myself. This year's got screened as part of the Sheffield Doc Fest here in the UK.
  • 1

#10 Dylan Gonzalez

Dylan Gonzalez
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts
  • Student

Posted 30 November 2012 - 01:52 AM

Thanks Bill! I did have fun and everything seemed to go smoothly - however, I have to wait to see how the footage turns out. It has been processed and I will be taking it to get telecined tomorrow. I basically just shot a bunch of different things around the city - cats, interesting grafiti, rundown buildings - so while the footage won't be breathtaking by any means, hopefully it will help me see if there are any problems with this camera (abrasions or dust on the lens, etc, etc).
  • 1

#11 Bill Rodgers

Bill Rodgers
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 120 posts
  • Director
  • London & Brighton UK

Posted 30 November 2012 - 09:22 AM

It's always good to just get out and shoot, plus I like the happy mistakes that often look beautiful when on Super 8. In all honesty, I find the odd bit of dust never did my footage any harm either, at least in this overly slick HD obsessed world.
  • 0

#12 Dylan Gonzalez

Dylan Gonzalez
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts
  • Student

Posted 30 November 2012 - 07:30 PM

Yeah, part of the scratchy, grungy look of Super 8 is what appeals to me. I think the wear and tear is part of its charm: the grain, the choppiness, etc. However, I bought this camera at a garage sale for $20, so I need to make sure there isn't something horribly wrong with it.
  • 0

#13 Bill Rodgers

Bill Rodgers
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 120 posts
  • Director
  • London & Brighton UK

Posted 30 November 2012 - 08:14 PM

That's fair enough, so I hope it proves to be just fine!
  • 0

#14 Mark Dunn

Mark Dunn
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1154 posts
  • Other
  • London

Posted 01 December 2012 - 08:42 AM

Thanks Bill! I did have fun and everything seemed to go smoothly - however, I have to wait to see how the footage turns out. It has been processed and I will be taking it to get telecined tomorrow. I basically just shot a bunch of different things around the city - cats, interesting grafiti, rundown buildings - so while the footage won't be breathtaking by any means, hopefully it will help me see if there are any problems with this camera (abrasions or dust on the lens, etc, etc).

What you need is a projector for instant gratification.
  • 1

#15 Bill Rodgers

Bill Rodgers
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 120 posts
  • Director
  • London & Brighton UK

Posted 01 December 2012 - 11:01 AM

What you need is a projector for instant gratification.



Yeah, that will always be far better than any frame by frame HD transfer too!
  • 0

#16 Dylan Gonzalez

Dylan Gonzalez
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 26 posts
  • Student

Posted 03 December 2012 - 02:10 AM

What you need is a projector for instant gratification.


Eh...if I could get a deal on one like I did for my camera, I'd be all for it, but I think I'd rather just wait the extra week or so to get the footage back. Its already about a weeks wait to get the film processed (at least at the place I went to), so I'm going to be waiting in anticipation for some time either way.
  • 0





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: super 8, canon 514, ecktachrome 100d, daylight filter

Pro 8mm

Cadrage Directors Viewfinder

Cinelicious

Robert Starling

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC

NIBL

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

System Associates

Abel Cine

rebotnix Technologies

Lemo Connectors

The Slider

CineTape

Zylight

CineLab

K5600 Lighting

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

rebotnix Technologies

NIBL

Aerial Filmworks

Pro 8mm

Abel Cine

CineTape

Glidecam

Zylight

The Slider

Ritter Battery

Lemo Connectors

Cinelicious

System Associates

Paralinx LLC

Robert Starling

K5600 Lighting

Cadrage Directors Viewfinder

Visual Products