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Shooting Kodak ektachrome 100D

kodak ektachrome 100D bolex 350 macro compact mountains

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#1 Nico

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:07 PM

Hi, I am new to the forum!

I recently bought a tested and fully working Bolex 350 Macro compact. I am new to super 8. The thing is I am planning an adventure with a friend: we are going to go up a volcano in the Andes. My idea is to document the ascent with the camera so I got some Kodak Ektachrome 100D.

Apparently this model doesn't detect this type of film automatically. From what I've been reading so far it looks like (since the camera is post 1970) it will shoot as if the film was 160 ISO so this is going to underexpose my film by about 1/2 stop. My question is, is this bearable? I suppose so but also since I will have ice and snow in the background most part of the ascent, perhaps I should use the overexposure (1 stop) all of the time. Also, should I do anything else? Put any filters, use the diaphragm lock, etc? I guess I can also shoot at 9 fps which would expose the film more, right?

I would hate if the film wasn't properly exposed. Also, apparently its a possibility that the camera detects 40 iso instead and overexposes by 1 1/4. But this seems unlikely.

Please give me your views and if anyone of you has experience with this camera or one that is similar I would be much obliged if you shared it with me.

Thank you very much!!!

Edited by Nico, 22 November 2012 - 12:09 PM.

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#2 Nico

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 12:17 PM

Oh, sorry guys. The guy who sold me the camera told me that it is actually the other way round. Here is his email:

Hi Nicolas,

The diaphragm hold button is indeed the EE lock, which freezes the aperture at the current exposure. The Bolex 350 is set to recognise 40D/60T so compensate with 100D and maybe hold the lock on the sky, as in bright/snowy conditions it is very easy to overexpose with 100D. Though that can be a nice effect in itself. Also be sure to TAP THE CARTRIDGE before insertion (they jam) and be sure to insert the filter key, as 100D is balanced for daylight so you need to disengage the internal 85 filter.

Ideally, in such snowy conditions you would take a cheap spot meter with you and set the aperture as you shoot but it could well prove quite tricky to do that. I would just try to carefully gauge the exposure by looking through the viewfinder and adjust each shot accordingly.

Just remember your 100D stock is faster than what the camera automatically exposes for, so you need to slightly close the aperture for the correct results. If this all proves to be a little too complicated (will you be running & gunning handheld or taking static shots?) then maybe just permanently compensate the exposure on the camera and then point out to the processing lab technician that it is possibly all overexposed. The flaw with that, is by shooting in snow you might get a white glowing screen and slightly blurred details. It all depends on just how bright it is.

I do hope you get great results!

Best wishes

Esta

Edited by Nico, 22 November 2012 - 12:17 PM.

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#3 Reinhard Herberigs

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Posted 22 November 2012 - 04:39 PM

Hi Nicolas,

I don't believe the cam detects 40D/60T film speed ! This seems to be an error.
This cam depends on the same technique as the EUMIG mini 5 makro zoom which detects the - at that time - common used film speeds:
25D/40T and 100D/160T
So I believe it is just a print error and should be 40/160 ASA (all tungsten) which were the standard cartridges at that time: Kodachrome 40 and Ektrachrome 160.

I do not know this cam, please check first of all if the camera has 2 pins inside above and below the film window opening which are "looking" for 2 openings in the cartridge. The upper pin is checking for the film speed, the lower one is checking for tungsten/dayligt.
Check the cut-outs (openings) at the front side of a K40 cartridge and the new E100D cartridge and you will better understand. The lower cut-out is to identify a tungsten cartridge, so the K40 has an opening and the E100D doesn't have one.
If the "tungsten-pin" is present (I doubt in that) then your camera will automatically set at least correctly the cam to daylight ot artificial light.

For a very more deeper understanding check out this german website of a friend (english version):
http://www.peaceman....ew-and-improved

Maybe you can than better identify how the cam will
- set the camera correctly to tungsten / daylight
- set the film speed

Let us know your results and ask again.

Best regards !
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#4 Bill Rodgers

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Posted 25 November 2012 - 02:45 PM

I'm sure that the Bolex 350 is 25/40 and 100/160 ASA (D/T).

I'm also sure that I gave the correct answer to that "guy" Esta (my Mum) last Thursday over the phone in regards to your question but I'm now not sure she took any notice of me. She probably made the mistake of asking my Dad for some added technical advice afterwards.

I tested that camera and my cousin Rob gave it a full service.




With all that snow in the background, underexposing by 1/2 stop might not be such a terrible way to shoot it all any way.
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#5 Nico

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 12:29 PM

@Reinhard: It did come with the pin

@Bill: Hahahaha thank you Bill!! What a coincidence! I love the camera. And you are right, for all inteded purposes if it underexposes by 1/2 its not the end of the world.

OK, so I put the film cartridge and checked the aperture levels on the screen. It seems to detect the film perfectly fine. When I compare the readings on my DSLR set at 100 ASA and 1/18 sec it gives me the same values, however that is without the pin. With the pin (for daylight shooting which is what I want) it gives me an aperture more or less 2 points smaller.
Ideally, what I will do if I have enough time and I'm able to find someone who will develop it quickly enough, is to test shoot the film. I plan to shoot one roll trying different things. I think the most logical thing to try is to use the pin and the overexposure button.

Edited by Nico, 26 November 2012 - 12:32 PM.

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#6 Nico

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 12:39 PM

What confuses me is that manual reads:

"The Bolex 350 Macro Compact is designed for Super 8 film in 50ft cartridges, with sensitivities of 25 or 100 ASA (15 or 21 DIN) daylight or 40 or 160 ASA (17 or 23 DIN) artificial light. "

So why is it underexposing when I disable the filter for daylight shooting? I feel I definitely need to shoot a roll and try different things to be sure now...
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#7 Bill Rodgers

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 01:40 PM

@Nico that was so funny to read, as my Mum had called me especially at the office to get my answer and then proceeded to tell you something totally different. She tells me that this page confused the matter: http://www.super8dat...acrocompact.htm


If you're taking it off to film that volcano in the Andes (I've some footage of El Misti in Arequipa myself), then I'd suggest you shoot a test cartridge if you can.

It's a bit of added peace of mind and it's always good to get to grips with the focussing on a new camera and a chance to check out it's handling. That particular 350 had both Tri-X and 100D through it with good crisp results but I'm always wary of the latter now.

Loads of my other cameras seem to struggle with the tension of the 100D carts, even after a good tap or two. They are so tightly wound, that even with new batteries my Eumig 880/881 PMAs and my Canon 1014XL-S have difficulty with the stock.
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#8 Chris Burke

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Posted 26 November 2012 - 02:04 PM

when testing, I would use a spot meter or good external incident meter set to 1/45. This will be the closest meter reading you will get for a 210 degree shutter, which this camera has. At 1/45, it will be ever so slightly underexposed. This is a good thing for reversal film which doesn't handle highlights as well as negative.
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