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Best possible image on a K3?


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#1 Gautam Valluri

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 09:03 AM

Hello People,

I'm finally going to shoot a short on my K3 end-December.

I've taken out the loop formers and cleaned up the camera inside out the best that I could.

I will be shooting on the 7222 stock and plan to have it processed at AlphaCine and then Telecine'd at Frame Discreet.

So my question to K3 and 7222 veterans:
Is there anything else I need to keep in mind to get the best possible image on my K3? What can I do to get that extra bit of goodness from the 7222?

Thanks,
Gautam
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#2 Giray Izcan

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 03:33 PM

I would say expose the film correctly, no over or underexposing. Tty to use m42 photo lenses for sharpness since you use the center of those lenses. Obviously, maintain a good focus.
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#3 Giray Izcan

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Posted 12 December 2012 - 03:41 PM

I forgot to mention one more thing. Expose for shadows, so those parts of the image are not underexposed, because negative handles highlights really good. However, if the exposure difference between the highlights and shadows ridiculously great, then meet in between those exposure values. For example, if the highligt reading is t16 and shadows are t4, I would set the aperture at 8 or between 5.61/2. Good luck.
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#4 Gautam Valluri

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 01:24 AM

Tty to use m42 photo lenses for sharpness since you use the center of those lenses.


I have the Bayonet mount K3- so I will be using only the stock 17-68mm Meteor lens.

I forgot to mention one more thing. Expose for shadows, so those parts of the image are not underexposed, because negative handles highlights really good. However, if the exposure difference between the highlights and shadows ridiculously great, then meet in between those exposure values. For example, if the highligt reading is t16 and shadows are t4, I would set the aperture at 8 or between 5.61/2. Good luck.


Giray, this is a very valuable tip for me. I have a tendency to lose the shadows completely (in my 35mm still photography). I will keep this mind while shooting.

Also, I am planning to use a Yellow filter on the day exterior shots and overexpose by 1 stop.

Thanks for the responses!
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#5 Giray Izcan

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 03:11 AM

I actually heard that the stock lens is pretty sharp. Good luck.
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#6 Will Montgomery

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 11:50 AM

Make sure to use 7222 as fresh from Kodak as you can. It is a grainy stock (especially in 16mm) in general but over time gets extremely grainy.

Remember back in the day when B&W negative stocks were actually used there was a TON of light. You want to raise your light level significantly. Don't just get it acceptable at your most open aperture; boost that light so everything stays relative but the shadows are not at the lowest aperture possible. Does that make sense?

That way in transfer you'll be able to achieve super blacks with little noise if you light this way. You can go a noir as you like and you'll get the most out of the stock. Easy to take light away in transfer, tough to bring it in without noise/grain.
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#7 Gautam Valluri

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 12:16 PM

Will, so glad my thread caught your eye!

Make sure to use 7222 as fresh from Kodak as you can. It is a grainy stock (especially in 16mm) in general but over time gets extremely grainy.


I had shipped to me in July and has been in the refrigerator since- so I'm hoping it won't be too bad.

Remember back in the day when B&W negative stocks were actually used there was a TON of light. You want to raise your light level significantly. Don't just get it acceptable at your most open aperture; boost that light so everything stays relative but the shadows are not at the lowest aperture possible. Does that make sense?


I think I get your point. I will aim to get the shadows a couple of stops above my lowest aperture. My reference visuals are all mostly uniformly lit faces and places- no deep shadows. I've got mostly day exterior shots- the light in Delhi this time of the year is gentle and in a week or so, there is fog expected and overcast conditions.

Thanks again! Much appreciated.
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#8 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 01:03 PM

You want to raise your light level significantly. Don't just get it acceptable at your most open aperture; boost that light so everything stays relative but the shadows are not at the lowest aperture possible. Does that make sense?


This is an important point and one I think is often overlooked in the modern day when people are so concerned with "low light" stock and digital cameras.

"Just because you can doesnt mean you should" applies here. That is why I didn't get why people liked super slow stocks like ekta 64t and kodachrome 40t. If you were outside on a sunny day, all was well. If you were shooting indoors...good luck with that.

When I shot 64t I had a halogen kit and still never got to stop down to lower than about 2.8. I wanted to get to the sweet spot, which to me seems to be 5.6, but I guess that's a matter of opinion. Nonetheless, it is true that to minimize that grain you need to stop it down.

I would argue that stopping down 500t significantly makes for finer grain these days than shooting 200t wide open. Hence why I love 500t.
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#9 Gautam Valluri

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 02:06 PM

I would argue that stopping down 500t significantly makes for finer grain these days than shooting 200t wide open.


Another useful tip! These are all going into my notebook.

Thanks Matthew.
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#10 Chris Burke

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Posted 13 December 2012 - 09:54 PM

practice loading and unloading the camera. also familiarize yourself with it so you can fix things as they arise
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#11 Gautam Valluri

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 01:51 AM

practice loading and unloading the camera. also familiarize yourself with it so you can fix things as they arise


Oh yeah, I got about 10' of scrap film that I'm using to get used to threading without loop formers.
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#12 Will Montgomery

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 01:29 PM

I had shipped to me in July and has been in the refrigerator since- so I'm hoping it won't be too bad.

I will be fine then. I just shot some Double-X from 1993 and the grain was pretty heavy but it worked for the project.
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#13 Gautam Valluri

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Posted 14 December 2012 - 02:02 PM

Haha 1993! Incredible.
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