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Elmo 110/ VISION3 200T in Daylight


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#1 Tom Ham

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 12:02 PM

Hey, i am new to super 8mm, and just bought myself a Elmo 110.

I also bought a few Vision3 200T carts.

Now in the ELMO 110 manual is says that i have:
Daylight: 25,40,64,100,160 ASA
Tung:40,64,100,160,250


Now i am pretty sure the camera doesnt have the 85 filter notch system. So il have to place the 85 filter myself.
My question is, how should i expose this? If i use auto exposure will it work in order(giving that the camera works in order). Or will it over or under expose, and if so, by how many stops?


Any help is appreciated!


Thank You
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#2 Tom Ham

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 12:03 PM

Forgot to add something. Most footage will be shot in the sun!
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#3 Paul Bartok

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 01:44 PM

Tungsten (3200K) - 200 ASA

Daylight- 125 ASA (with 85 filter)
I wouldn't trust the auto exposure too much on older cameras like that with a Filter in front of it.
Do it manually, now Im not sure If your camera has a ASA setting that corresponds to exposure?
But if so punch in 100ASA and put on your 85 filter. the difference would be a 1/3 stop which is barely anything better to
slightly underexpose then over expose.

Otherwise you can retime the scan in post to match 5600K.
You should read the following document:

http://motion.kodak....data/TI5213.pdf
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#4 Paul Bartok

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Posted 24 December 2012 - 01:46 PM

The 85 filter ASA is based on 180 shutter and 24fps.
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#5 Chris Burke

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 10:03 AM

Find out what the shutter angle is and go from there. Use a spot meter and over expose by one stop if you can. Use and external 85. Do not use Auto anything on the camera unless you know it works. Really scour this site, lots of answers are already posted. I am always on here telling people how much latitude this stock has, especially in the highlights.
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#6 Chris Burke

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 10:08 AM

is this your camera?? http://super8wiki.co.../Elmo_Super_110
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#7 Tom Ham

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Posted 28 December 2012 - 09:30 PM

Paul: Thanks for the reply, ive read the film specs! Very helpfull!

Chris: Yep, that is my camera indeed.


One thing ive noticed, is that in Auto mode, in a sunny day, my exposure is almost completely shut. Is that normal?
I don't currently have access to a light meter, and will have to depend on the auto exposure, at least for these cartidges.

I will read on into the forum, i just wanted a more precise input on the specific camera and film stock!
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#8 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 29 December 2012 - 01:47 AM

Hi Tom,
all super 8 cameras have built in 85 filters. Some people prefer to use an external filter instead of the camera's internal filter. The elmo you have is very likely to have a filter notch detector. I say this because most cameras that don't have a filter notch detector are cameras that have a 'sun/bulb' filter switch externally on the camera. Instead of a switch, your elmo has a 'movie light screw'. Inserting the screw is how the filter is removed. As I say, usually such cameras will also have a filter notch pin. This would remove the filter when a daylight cartridge is inserted, but not when a tungsten cartridge is inserted. Now, the 200T cartridge, even though it is a tungsten film, has no filter notch cut into it. Kodak consider these professional films. As such, they assume you will want to use an external filter. So, you will need to cut a filter notch in the cartridge. Google that. But you will also need to confirm whether the camera does have a filter notch detector. If you are unsure, you can email me an image of the interior of the film chamber.
As for the asa your camera will identify this film as being, it is very likely it will identify the film as 100 daylight (or 160 tungsten if you cut in a notch).
hope that helps,
richard
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#9 Chris Burke

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 12:08 AM

Paul: Thanks for the reply, ive read the film specs! Very helpfull!

Chris: Yep, that is my camera indeed.


One thing ive noticed, is that in Auto mode, in a sunny day, my exposure is almost completely shut. Is that normal?
I don't currently have access to a light meter, and will have to depend on the auto exposure, at least for these cartidges.

I will read on into the forum, i just wanted a more precise input on the specific camera and film stock!


on a sunny day with that film, you will be fine, nothing to really worry about. If you can, use an external 85 filter, glass. Chances are the internal one in the camera is pushing 40 years old and might be rather degraded, it is probably made out of gelatin. You can get them rather cheap these days. Also be advised that running that camera at 54 fps might be harmful, until that is you can get it tuned up and it passes inspection. I don't know if any one works on them, but gears and belts and lubricant can dry up over time, running the camera that fast might break it. my advice is buy a few more cameras.
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#10 Will Montgomery

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Posted 07 January 2013 - 10:19 AM

There is a line of Super 8 cameras that asks you to set the film speed manually rather than using the cartridge's notch system. If you continue with Super 8 and really enjoy it I suggest looking into the Beaulieu cameras. With all the changes going on at Kodak it might be good to have a camera where you can control everything.
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