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A couple of stupid beginner's questions


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#1 Joseph Konrad

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 04:29 PM

1. What is the difference between Kodak 100T and Kodak 100D? I would assume "D" stands for digital, but I don't know what the differences are in terms of how the film would be constructed/processed.

2. What is the cheapest method to get Super8 processed, transferred to HD, and blown up to 16mm for traditional cutting on a flatbed? (HD transfer optional) in 2013.

Thanks!

Edited by Joseph Konrad, 02 January 2013 - 04:31 PM.

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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 04:46 PM

100T is a Tungsten Balanced Negative film stock, 100D Is a Daylight Balanced Reversal stock. The 100 refers to it's sensitivity to light, T and D to their color balancing, T is set for "white 3200" and D for "white 5600."

Processing wise, one would go through the ENC2 Process for Negative film, whereas the other would go through E6 chemistry (I think, though not 100% positive on this) for reversal.
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#3 Joseph Konrad

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 04:52 PM

^^Thank you very much.
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 04:53 PM

My pleasure.
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#5 Marc Roessler

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 06:10 PM

Just to avoid confusion...
Note that 100T and 100D doesn't say anything about how the film is to be processed. It just tells you speed (100 ASA or EI) and color balance (Tungsten vs. Daylight). The process is usually listed on the can, in most cases it's ECN-2 (i.e. normal color negative process) or E6 (normal color reversal process).

For Kodak's (somewhat) current stocks, there is only one 100D stock made by Kodak, and it is 7285 Ektachrom Reversal Film for E6 processing. 100T may refer to the (somewhat) latest version 7212, but there have been older stocks called 100T as well.

It's always a good idea to add kodak's number (7212, 7285, ..) when mentioning a stock, then it's what clear which stock you refer to.

Welcome to the boards.
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 06:36 PM

Very true Marc.

Another thing with Kodak, the 72 denotes, normally 16mm (but also 8mm) and the 52 denotes 35mm. They are the same stocks, just cut to varying sizes. Also almost all kodak 16mm stock is 1R-- 2R can be special order, the R# is for perfs, either single perf (1R) or double perf (2R). All 35mm film is 2R.
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#7 Joseph Konrad

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 06:50 PM

Thanks a lot- it is great to have this information boiled down into more straightforward terms.
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#8 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 09:49 PM

Hey Joseph,
When you were looking for 35mm stock from the 70s (?) recently, were you looking for stock that was frozen, hopefully useable?

What's the project? Are you going to use smaller guage stock to try and replicate or make a style reference to the feel of 35mm stock from that era?
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#9 Joseph Konrad

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:25 AM

Hey Joseph,
When you were looking for 35mm stock from the 70s (?) recently, were you looking for stock that was frozen, hopefully useable?

What's the project? Are you going to use smaller guage stock to try and replicate or make a style reference to the feel of 35mm stock from that era?


Hi Gregg, No, this is for something completely different. But yes, I was and am still looking for those Kodak stocks from the 70s and 80s. Those slower speeds, combined with those specific stocks, combined with the carbon arc lights and the lenses (the latter two are much easier to procure), gives a very, very specific look that is very specific to that combination of tools.

I was just watching two episodes of Kojak this morning, season 1. That look is beautiful to me. You could film completely garbage and it still looks like gold today. They weren't going after a look- it was just the tools they were working with and the canvas they had to paint with. All of those 1970s TV shows look the same, and it is great. I want to find those tools.

Of course, it is not important whether the stock is actually from the 70s- just that it is at the correct speed and formulated the way the older films were. For example, if Kodak started producing the 70s/80s stocks again in limited quantities in 2013, that would be just as good. It's not an emotional thing- strictly about the results. And I have not seen anything that looks halfway as good as those 70s TV show and movie negatives. People will say, "Oh, you can just use this stock with these lenses and edit in post and it will look just about identical," but you look at examples and it is never even close.

I am probably the only one this passionate about getting that film stock remanufactured, but that is what I have to show for years of watching and studying Columbo, Mannix, Kojak, Bob Newhart, The Rockford Files, and Charlie's Angels. Thank you for your question, Gregg!

Edited by Joseph Konrad, 03 January 2013 - 11:26 AM.

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#10 Mark Dunn

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:42 AM

100D has been discontinued bu there are still a couple of expensive alternatives.
Blowing up Super-8 to 16mm. would be extremely expensive. Why would you want to do that? You can cut Super-8 reversal just as well, with care, bearing in mind you are cutting original film and that splices will show somewhat.
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#11 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 11:52 AM

The speed itself isn't so much the issue other than the limitations of 100 ASA film forced filmmakers to certain techniques, they couldn't just keep shooting in available light as you can more easily with 500 ASA film stock. On the other hand, if the grain of a higher-speed stock matches that of an older slower-speed stock, one could use ND filters if you really wanted to tie one hand behind your back... Trouble is that it's not just the graininess of older stocks (and 1970's 100 ASA stock like 5254 or 5247 wasn't that grainy except when pushed) it's the shape of the grain, the edge-sharpness (or lack thereof), etc. Not that you'd see it well on most distribution formats like the internet.

Modern Super-16 movies can "feel" more like a rough 1970's 35mm movie except for the lack of resolution in wide shots, 35mm even back then still delivered more resolution. The popularity of zooms back then like the Cooke 5:1 partially accounts for some lack of resolution, particularly in 1970's TV shows which used the even softer 10:1 Angeniuex zooms, so either shoot in Super-16 primes for that look or 35mm with the older zooms.
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#12 Joseph Konrad

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 04:46 PM

^^Thank you very much for this insight.
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#13 Joseph Konrad

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 11:28 AM

What if one were to shoot super 16 at extremely slow speeds? Maybe that would improve resolution in the wide shots....

Thank you again to all who have replied to this thread. I am slowly gaining an understanding of how to make this work.
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#14 David Owen James

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 02:35 PM

Are there any colour reversal 16mm stocks available now, or was ektachrome the last one?
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#15 Zac Fettig

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 03:48 PM

Ektachrome was it.
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