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#1 KevinMckendree

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 08:19 AM

I am looking to get back into the freelance videography/ cinematography position, and I want to get myself a DSLR set-up. As of right now, I do not know where to start, but as of right now I am leaning toward a Canon 5d Mk. II or III set up. A friend of mine suggested that I should start with a T3I and work my way up from there, but of all of the test and video's I have been watching, I did not research the T3I as much. But with the research I have been doing, I am impressed with the quality of the 5d Mk3 models.

I have been out of the videography field a while and I want to inch my way back in. As of right now, my goal is to shoot Shorts and commercials, nothing too major or complicated at first. I used to work as a ENG operator, but it has been years.

I am still debating between the T3I and the 5d mk3. Since I am broke, I should logically go toward the T3I, but I like the quality of the 5d. What will be a good first lense to get? Also what will be a good set up to go along with the camera? (I am good on audio.)
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#2 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 08:29 AM

I have never really seen what the purpose of paying so much more for the 5D was. If I were you, I would just buy a t3i kit and save a ton of dough. I doubt the people who will hire you at that level will care either way. Work on your skills and then decide whether the cash is worth investing in something better. Dont worry about resale, the lower end DSLRs seem to hold their value pretty well since its such a small investment to begin with.
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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 08:39 AM

I am kind of keen on a GH2 setup, as you can hack it and adapt pretty much any lens to that system. Also the slightly smaller chip, while costing some light sensetivity, gives a bit more DoF which is important when you're not working with a talented AC. But, beyond just that, I would also highly recommend, if you want to work primarily in videography, to look into the many systems currently out there which offer larger sensors in more of a camcorder body-- such as the Sony FS100, Panasonic AF101. Further, there is the soon to be out and about (one hopes) Black Magic Design camera, which while not perfect in the least, for about $3000 is one hell of a system offering not only the camera but a very nice piece of grading software in the bundle and the ability to shoot both RAW (for when you need it) and more importantly, ProRes and DNxHD, bypassing the main weak link in vDSLRs, the h.264 compression.
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