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Pros and cons of shooting 100D indoors with a blue filter


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#1 Joseph Konrad

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 09:42 AM

Hello,
I am hoping to move forward on a new movie very soon, and I am intending to shoot 100D in 16mm because 100T does not seem to be available. I was wondering what the disadvantage would be- I have read some things indicating that the filter really cuts down on the latitude. Thank you very much.
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#2 Mark Dunn

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 10:28 AM

Not the latitude, just 2 stops of speed, so you are down to 25.
100D is the only reversal stock left and it's discontinued, so presumably you have as much as you need.
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#3 Joseph Konrad

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 10:46 AM

Thanks. I see 100D Ektachrome on the Kodak website, but I have read in other threads that they may be merely finishing stock they already started.

It's too bad there is not a 500D film- wouldn't shooting that indoors with the filter bring me to around 100 speed? Thanks again.
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#4 Joseph Konrad

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 11:07 AM

And another related question- what is the visual effect of stopping very fast films at very slow speeds- is that possible? Would you get that high quality depth of field and responsiveness (lack of responsiveness) to light of a slower film but the larger grain of the faster film? I am trying to get as close to the 1970s 100T 5424 as possible using photochemical methods (lenses, audio, and everything else aside).

Edited by Joseph Konrad, 08 January 2013 - 11:09 AM.

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#5 Mark Dunn

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 11:08 AM

http://motion.kodak....PCN120312_Q.pdf
100D was the only remaining 16mm. reversal stock. There has been no fast reversal since the demise of VNF.
The only other options are colour neg, which comes in tungsten and daylight versions,and black and white.
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#6 Joseph Konrad

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 11:17 AM

http://motion.kodak....PCN120312_Q.pdf
100D was the only remaining 16mm. reversal stock. There has been no fast reversal since the demise of VNF.
The only other options are colour neg, which comes in tungsten and daylight versions,and black and white.


Sorry, I was off on a tangent my last two posts, was referring hypothetically to 35mm color neg stock.
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#7 Joseph Konrad

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 11:23 AM

http://motion.kodak....PCN120312_Q.pdf
100D was the only remaining 16mm. reversal stock. There has been no fast reversal since the demise of VNF.
The only other options are colour neg, which comes in tungsten and daylight versions,and black and white.


Sorry, I was off on a tangent my last two posts, was referring hypothetically to 35mm color neg stock.

And another question that comes to mind (sorry for all these posts!) after rereading David Mullen's post (which confirms that you could use ND filters on high speed, grainier color-neg), what if you then pushed that in the lab?

Although it sounds silly, here would be the workflow:

Kodak 500T>>filters>>shooting what is effectively 100 or slower speed film>>possibly push-process to 200 or 400 if necessary given the lighting situation for the scene.

I wonder what it would look like...

Edited by Joseph Konrad, 08 January 2013 - 11:25 AM.

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#8 Zac Fettig

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 11:51 AM

Grainy. It'll look grainy.

I thought 5424 was a IR B&W film. Kodak Infrared Aerographic, on a polyester base. Do you mean 5247?
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#9 Joseph Konrad

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 02:18 PM

Grainy. It'll look grainy.

I thought 5424 was a IR B&W film. Kodak Infrared Aerographic, on a polyester base. Do you mean 5247?


Hi Zach,
Sorry, stupid mistake- I meant 5254, which 5247 replaced.

Grain is good, but very grainy is not the actual objective (the grain will come if we have the opportunity to make general release prints!)- depth of field and that 3D look of slower film is the objective, plus a larger SIZED grain (i.e., not too tight-more dissimilarity from frame to subsequent frame), plus being able to use the hard lighting techniques made necessary with slower speed film, but which today look corny with higher speed film.

Hmm...what if you shot at ASA 25 (the most modern, fine grained 500T 35mm with lots of filters) and then pushed to 100 ASA?

I think the only way to answer my questions for sure is get a variety of films and pick the lab we're going to go with, and just run lots of different tests in lots of different conditions, stopped, filtered, and pushed in different ways, and project dailies and compare them.

This will be costly, but ultimately worthwhile, I think.
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#10 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 08 January 2013 - 06:17 PM

Having shot with the VNF reversal stocks, they didn't look anything like the neg stocks such as 5247 or even 5254, which are the 35mm versions. I don't know how well the current Ektachrome prints, but the old reversal stocks weren't great for creating prints from.
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