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Safely removing and shooting 7219 stored in a freezer


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#1 Mike Tounian

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 05:48 AM

Hi Folks,

A coworker of mine has been holding onto about 4,000' of 7219 in his freezer for the last three to four years. It has a low-ish emulsion number at 067, but apparently right after he acquired them they went into the chiller and haven't left since.

I have read about the necessity for proper care of film when it comes out of the freezer, with any number of issues from wild color shifts to ice crystals, etc. and would like to know how to avoid them. What is the proper way to ease them out of the freezer and keep them viable for shooting? Do they need to be refrigerated for a few days before coming out?

Thank you for your advice lads!

Mike T
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#2 Mark Dunn

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 06:23 AM

As long as it's in the original packing, just let it defrost for a day. If it's been in a case, separate the cans. Just imagine you're defrosting a turkey of the same size, about 10lb. Then, assuming it's all going to be usedin a few months, keep it somewhere cool and dry. Otherwise, put it back in the freezer.
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#3 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 06:30 AM

As long as you let it defrost first, you can safely put the unused stock back in the freezer as many times as needed. Freezing high-speed film will lessen fog buildup by chemical aging but not the fog buildup from gamma-rays. So, even in the freezer it will accumulate fog over time. Lower speed films (50 ISO) keep much longer.
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 06:36 AM

Also don't try to speed up defrosting by putting it in the microwave or anything like that ;)
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#5 Mark Dunn

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 06:51 AM

The cans will be opaque to microwaves but they should spark nicely.
No harm putting them at a sunny window though, just don't cook them. Shouldn't be a problem in January. Wouldn't be here, anyway.
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#6 Mike Tounian

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Posted 09 January 2013 - 01:43 PM

As long as you let it defrost first, you can safely put the unused stock back in the freezer as many times as needed. Freezing high-speed film will lessen fog buildup by chemical aging but not the fog buildup from gamma-rays. So, even in the freezer it will accumulate fog over time. Lower speed films (50 ISO) keep much longer.


Thank you Gents, I really appreciate your comments.

Since Dirk brought it up, I have a follow up question about fogging. I know a 500T is going to cook off faster than anything else, but if properly maintained in a freezer, approximately how long can it survive before the blue levels are too elevated (by Kodak's standards)? Anyone have long term storage experiences to share?

Additionally, does gamma-ray fogging cause the same effect or type of fogging that chemical aging does? I know from unfortunate experience that chemical aging causes the blue layer to go first, but do gamma-rays affect film the same way?

Thanks again!

M
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