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Wittner Chrome V50D in Nizo 4080 - correct exposure?


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#1 James Bull

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 08:26 AM

I got into the Super 8 hobby last summer and I'm interested to try out the new Wittner Chrome V50D now that Ektachrome 100D has vanished.

One thing I've not been able to figure out is how my camera will expose the new 50D film.

According to the manual, my Nizo 4080 can expose the following:


ASA (daylight) 25 40 64 100 160 250 400
ASA (artificial) 40 64 100 160 250 400 500 640

Some things I've read have indicated it may well read it as 40 ASA, but is that true?

As far as I know, the 4080 is very similar to the 6080, at least in terms of metering. So if anyone has experience with 50D film in either of these cameras, I'm interested to hear the results.
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#2 David Cunningham

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 09:02 AM

Hi James,

it should read it as 40D which should be fine in most situations. You might get some highlight blowout. I'm not sure how sensitive Velvia 50 is to over exposure. But, it will be less than half a stop and I bet you're meter isn't accurate within any more than 1 stop anyhow. :)
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#3 Bill Rodgers

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 09:09 AM

I've found that you can pretty much load any stock into a 4080 or 6080 and usually get great, near perfectly exposed, beautiful end results.

Both Braun Nizo models are very forgiving pieces of camera kit, which is ideal for the lazy Film-maker!
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#4 Reinhard Herberigs

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 05:39 PM

Hi James,

it should read it as 40D which should be fine in most situations. You might get some highlight blowout. I'm not sure how sensitive Velvia 50 is to over exposure. But, it will be less than half a stop and I bet you're meter isn't accurate within any more than 1 stop anyhow. :)


Exactly ! It is only 1/3 stop and this will be absolutely no problem. I used the Velvia 50D in a Nizo professional which reads the film also as 40D.
Be sure to set the button for artificial/daylight filter to the sun symbol as the Super8-cartridge will disable the artificial built-in filter automatically. Setting the switch to the bulb symbol will cause an underexposure by 2/3 stops.

The Velvia50D is a very good film, fine grain and sharp.

Edited by Reinhard Herberigs, 17 January 2013 - 05:40 PM.

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#5 James Bull

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 06:28 PM

Thanks for the advice. I'm looking forward to trying out the V50D once I've used my last roll of Ektachrome. Glad to hear that metering at 40 ASA will be no problem.

Also, regarding the last post - I thought the bulb symbol disabled the internal filter, while the sun symbol engaged it? At least that's what it says on the Ektachrome 100D boxes?
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#6 Bill Rodgers

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 06:57 PM

Also, regarding the last post - I thought the bulb symbol disabled the internal filter, while the sun symbol engaged it? At least that's what it says on the Ektachrome 100D boxes?


Yep, switch it to the tungsten/light-bulb setting to withdraw the internal 85 filter when shooting daylight balanced stock.
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#7 Reinhard Herberigs

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 07:36 PM

Yep, switch it to the tungsten/light-bulb setting to withdraw the internal 85 filter when shooting daylight balanced stock.


Attention Bill ! It is not true that you have to set each Super8- camera to the bulb symbol in order to withdraw the internal 85 filter.
The internal filter is often already withdrawn by the cartidge!

The Nizo constructors have been fully aware about daylight and artificial film material.
There a 2 pins (please check that again for the 4080, i checked the 6080), the lower one searches for a daylight or tungsten film cartridge.
I used my Nizo professional the first time also with bulb setting and received somewhat dark pictures because it exposed 2/3 stops under (I used the E100D however). Later i noticed that the filter was withdrawn just by inserting the cartridge as there is a second pin which detects a daylight cartridge.

If you use a Beaulieu 4008 for example you are rigtht. You must withdraw the filter manually and set the camera to the correct filmspeed (e.g. 50 ASA for the V50D or 100 ASA for the E100D).
Also some simple cameras with just 1 pin need your recommended setting. These cameras will work fine by setting them to the bulb symbol as they will then detect the Velvia 50D as a 40ASA film with use of no filter.

If you set the Nizo 4080 to the bulb symbol it will read the V50D as ASA 64 and expose the film a little bit under by 1/3 stop. However this may also work as 1I3 stop is not much but I recommend to give the V50D (and the E100D also) some more light by 1/3 stop. The E100D comes out with finer grain if you open the aperture by 1/3-2/3 stop. Try it!

Honestly this theme may fear a beginner but ... just try both positions with your first cartridge as a test. As Dave already said the lightmeter may be a bit disadjusted anyway. No fear ..
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#8 Richard Tuohy

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 01:18 AM

Yes, Kodak was quite wrong to write on the 100d box that you should leave the sun/bulb switch on 'bulb'. This is quite wrong for most super 8 cameras. The exceptions are cameras that can't read the smpte notch coding for 100d anyway. It is as though kodak (or the person who designed the box) didn't understand the smpte super 8 notch system.
From memory the Velvia 50d is notched as what would officially be called the 25d notch. The asa notch is the same size as the old Kodachrome 40 notch, but without the filter notch. The K40 asa notch was 40 t which is the same as the 25d notch. However, the German Bauer cameras which don't have a filter notch detector, read velvia as 40 (and you should switch the filter switch to bulb).
The way to make cameras that do have a filter notch reader and do in fact differentiate between daylight and tungsten speeds (and not all cameras with filter notches do that - so were designed to work with type-G film ... (long story)) is to cut in a filter notch on the velvia cartridge, then switch the filter out by putting the switch on 'bulb' or inserting the filter key or screw.
Its very complex stuff. As suggested above, best is to try it and know for next time how it works in your camera.
cheers,
richard
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#9 Bill Rodgers

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 06:58 AM

I happily shot over twenty 100D cartridges (without one jam - unlike my 1014XL-S) through my 6080 and if they were all slightly under exposed by having the switch set at tungsten/light-bulb... I honestly didn't notice it in the end results.

They were all exposed outside in bright daylight, so I'd conclude that the 1/3 under exposure didn't harm my own footage in any way.

If you can shoot a test film do so though, as it's always worth doing.
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#10 Reinhard Herberigs

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 01:06 PM

Hi to everybody,

indeed it is really a quite complicate subjet as Richard said and it is always worth to shoot a testfilm due to the age of our cameras.
Bill, next time give it a try and set the button to the sun symbol please (at least for some scenes) and maybe you will see your next E100D with other eyes ;-)
Do not forget that your lightmeter may be a bit disadjusted which may end up in good results even with a non-optimal setting.
Let us know ... same for James !
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#11 Bill Rodgers

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 01:25 PM

I have just a single 100D cartridge left but I could still test that out!
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#12 Reinhard Herberigs

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 01:56 PM

It will also give you an idea when loading V50D or Vision3 50D into your cam!

By the way E100D is still available and will for some time. As you are located in the UK check out Wittner in Germany, also Gauge film in the UK:
www.gaugefilm.co.uk

I think prices are quite reasonnable, however I do not know processing quality of Gauge film. Wittner as well as Andec in Germany are excellent.
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#13 Mark Dunn

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 02:34 PM

He is hand processing in a LOMO tank and has a disclaimer for inconsistency.
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#14 Bill Rodgers

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 02:50 PM

I have sent work related Super 8 footage to just about everyone but I have yet to use Kevin's services at www.gaugefilm.co.uk !
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#15 James Bull

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Posted 18 January 2013 - 04:24 PM

I think I will just test it with and without the filter enabled when I get some V50D!
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#16 Anthony Schilling

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Posted 19 January 2013 - 08:20 PM

The Nizo 401/801 silent camera series DID need to left on daylight to expose 100D at 100ASA. The tungston setting would under expose by 2/3rds. so the sound models are different. I usually liked my reversal exposed dead on, or 1/3rd under which made the colors pop a little more with the extra density.
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