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Film Fogging

shipping from UK to US

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#1 Chris Burke

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Posted 31 January 2013 - 11:17 AM

Since Fuji film is on its way out, I thought I might stock up a bit. I am in Boston USA, if I were to purchase some online, what are people's opinions about it fogging on the journey overseas? Would it fog much? I am not joking, but could I literally put it on the slow boat and avoid x raying? I do mean a boat and not a plane. I am not in a hurry to get it.
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#2 Dirk DeJonghe

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 02:31 AM

We have never had any problem with X-ray damage to films shipped by Fedex, UPS DHL etc. All damage was seen on films carried as checked luggage on passenger flights.
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#3 David Cunningham

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 08:02 AM

We have never had any problem with X-ray damage to films shipped by Fedex, UPS DHL etc. All damage was seen on films carried as checked luggage on passenger flights.


Your bigger risk is actually the gamma radiation levels. A good solar flare will do more damage than the x-rays at airports. The checked luggage x-rays are far stronger than the carry-on or postal x-rays.

Are you going to be buying from the UK or USA Fuji locations? Both are running some excellent deals right now on their currently still available stocks. The USA office quoted me as low as $24/ 100ft load of 16mm F64D. Also, if you are talking about 64D, or any of their 250 or 160 stocks, highly unlikely that x-rays will bother them. The 500 speeds start to push the limit.
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#4 David Cunningham

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 08:05 AM

Chris,

Contact Sharon Chepil at <schepil@fujifilm.com>. She's a direct to the public sales rep that I was working with a few weeks ago.

If you do work with her, mention that I suggested her to you. I felt bad when I did not buy anything from her after making her run around to get me pricing. I just decided to buy stock (Kodak) that I could reasonably see finding again a year from now in case I wanted more to have a consistent look in a film.

Dave
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#5 Paul Bartok

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 04:36 AM

Your bigger risk is actually the gamma radiation levels. A good solar flare will do more damage than the x-rays at airports. The checked luggage x-rays are far stronger than the carry-on or postal x-rays.

Are you going to be buying from the UK or USA Fuji locations? Both are running some excellent deals right now on their currently still available stocks. The USA office quoted me as low as $24/ 100ft load of 16mm F64D. Also, if you are talking about 64D, or any of their 250 or 160 stocks, highly unlikely that x-rays will bother them. The 500 speeds start to push the limit.



At altitudes much higher then 25000 feet you need about 120 feet of concrete to protect you from the gamma rays,
Gamma rays induce voltages in sensor that destroy pixels. While it usually is little to none, I've never heard of film being affected by Gamma rays.
Would you have any articles about this? Would be interested in reading about it, Always thought the biggest threat was X-rays?
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#6 Chris Burke

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 07:32 AM

If the US Fuji has similar deals, I will go with them. The shipping cost might negate the savings I would get buying from the UK site. I am more interested in daylight stocks. Love that 250D. I did speak with a gentleman from Fuji in the fall, late October I think and he quoted me 41¢ per foot. Like I said, if they have a similar deal as in the UK, I will bite.
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#7 David Cunningham

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 10:44 PM

At altitudes much higher then 25000 feet you need about 120 feet of concrete to protect you from the gamma rays,
Gamma rays induce voltages in sensor that destroy pixels. While it usually is little to none, I've never heard of film being affected by Gamma rays.
Would you have any articles about this? Would be interested in reading about it, Always thought the biggest threat was X-rays?


http://www.kodak.com...b/tib5202.shtml

About gamma radiation and film.
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#8 Andries Molenaar

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 05:24 AM

At altitudes much higher then 25000 feet you need about 120 feet of concrete to protect you from the gamma rays,
Gamma rays induce voltages in sensor that destroy pixels. While it usually is little to none, I've never heard of film being affected by Gamma rays.
Would you have any articles about this? Would be interested in reading about it, Always thought the biggest threat was X-rays?


You expect an article? Please show a scientific source on the 120 feet concrete.

Edited by Andries Molenaar, 05 February 2013 - 05:24 AM.

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#9 Paul Bartok

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 05:48 AM

You expect an article? Please show a scientific source on the 120 feet concrete.


I think you need to settle down mate,
"You expect an article" yes I asked if he had one? as I've never heard about gamma rays affecting film before, I wanted to read about it,
DIDN'T know it was a crime to learn. Are you one of those people that come here to feed there egos or to learn and assist people?
David posted the link to the information, I don't see how it's any of your concern, I think that would be David's priority.


According to a presentation by Rob Hummel (Kodak) at the Cine Gear Expo 2011, carrying digital cameras onto planes and reaching an altitude of over 20,000 feet will expose your camera to Gamma rays, which can apparently “fry” some of the photosites on the sensor.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=98FZ8C6HneE&feature=player_detailpage#t=476s
Around 8:00

Generally if a company ie. KODAK would post such evidence to the internet, you would except it to be founded, while I don't just believe everything companies say, It sounded quite realistic and logical, I think it could be possible but I'm always open to new ideas and interpretations.
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#10 David Cunningham

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 08:39 AM

I think you need to settle down mate,
"You expect an article" yes I asked if he had one? as I've never heard about gamma rays affecting film before, I wanted to read about it,
DIDN'T know it was a crime to learn. Are you one of those people that come here to feed there egos or to learn and assist people?
David posted the link to the information, I don't see how it's any of your concern, I think that would be David's priority.


According to a presentation by Rob Hummel (Kodak) at the Cine Gear Expo 2011, carrying digital cameras onto planes and reaching an altitude of over 20,000 feet will expose your camera to Gamma rays, which can apparently “fry” some of the photosites on the sensor.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=98FZ8C6HneE&feature=player_detailpage#t=476s
Around 8:00

Generally if a company ie. KODAK would post such evidence to the internet, you would except it to be founded, while I don't just believe everything companies say, It sounded quite realistic and logical, I think it could be possible but I'm always open to new ideas and interpretations.


Although likely based in some sort of truth, Rob Hummel's presentation has been disputed by many in the digital industry and lack of any scientific research or further evidence helps their case against Mr Hummel.

In either case, gamma radiation is more likely to cause damage in long term doses and/or extra high doses due to solar storms. So, the likelihood of gamma radiation damage to lower speed films (most motion picture films) is very low. Very few complaints have been logged regarding digital sensors and gamma radiation levels seen in planes.

Whatever the case. Just make sure your film is not luggage checked and checked-luggage x-rayed. That'll pretty much junk it.
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#11 Paul Bartok

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Posted 05 February 2013 - 09:14 AM

Although likely based in some sort of truth, Rob Hummel's presentation has been disputed by many in the digital industry and lack of any scientific research or further evidence helps their case against Mr Hummel.


At the time gamma radiation was not really my number one thing to research but after doing some research I would have to agree with you on that David.
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