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Shooting indoor green screen on EPIC. What are best camera settings?


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#1 Josh Pickering

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Posted 01 February 2013 - 02:25 PM

First off, the actor will be about 25- 30ft off the screen. The GS will be 20x40 and lit with 6K space lights. No green on the floor she will be standing on.

I've heard a lot of posts on sites around the web that if shooting indoor green screen on the Epic, to use daylight sources or use an 80C filter. Has anybody had any experience with this? I've just always shot tungsten lights on GS, black shade the Epic before the shoot, and white balance. My second question is: what is the best compression ratio to shoot green screen on the epic? Best Shutter, ISO, etc...

Any help is greatly appreciated.
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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 03:49 AM

First off, the actor will be about 25- 30ft off the screen. The GS will be 20x40 and lit with 6K space lights. No green on the floor she will be standing on.

I've heard a lot of posts on sites around the web that if shooting indoor green screen on the Epic, to use daylight sources or use an 80C filter. Has anybody had any experience with this? I've just always shot tungsten lights on GS, black shade the Epic before the shoot, and white balance. My second question is: what is the best compression ratio to shoot green screen on the epic? Best Shutter, ISO, etc...

Any help is greatly appreciated.



I generally use 1/4 CTB on tungsten lights with Epic. For green scren 640 ISO & 5:1 or LESS compression.
I very rarely black shade the camera, however have the camera on for 30 minutes before you do the black shade. You can always check if the camera needs to be shaded by increasing ISO whilst looking at black, if everything is even don't bother!
If you use 12:1 compression, ISO 800 & no CTB you will find dark areas on skin are not so good.
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#3 Josh Pickering

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 02:31 PM

Stephen,

Thanks for your reply. From what I understand, shooting 5:1 compression vs 3:1 compression has a minimal difference. I agree with shooting 640 ISO. We have 1 day prep before and will test out a few settings/lighting and will also test your recommendation. Thanks again. Shoot on!
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#4 Patrick Nuse

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 02:57 AM

From my experience green lights to light green screen is ideal. Like the green kinos. but if you have to work with tungsten, at least put some CTB if you dont have green gels. The red in the tungsten light makes the green screen really difficult to key on.
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#5 Josh Pickering

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Posted 12 February 2013 - 10:50 PM

Maybe this is a stupid question...From what I'm reading am I to CTB the lights only hitting the green screen? And the subject? I feel it's for the greenscreen only, but just making sure if I need to keep the light consistent through the shot. Thanks!


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#6 Patrick Nuse

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 03:52 AM

CTB only for the green screen. then balance you subject as usual with whatever your lighting with. hopefully tungsten as you will then not spoil the balance of the green screen. make sure you light your subject without your subject lights spilling on the background. try to have the green screen as far back as possible. as a bonus, the green screen will then also be out of focus to hide any patterns it may have. also definately do some tests to see what exposure works best for the green screen so that it will key easily.


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#7 Stephen Williams

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Posted 13 February 2013 - 03:26 PM

CTB only for the green screen. then balance you subject as usual with whatever your lighting with. hopefully tungsten as you will then not spoil the balance of the green screen. make sure you light your subject without your subject lights spilling on the background. try to have the green screen as far back as possible. as a bonus, the green screen will then also be out of focus to hide any patterns it may have. also definately do some tests to see what exposure works best for the green screen so that it will key easily.

I would use a 1/4 CTB on everything, What if the person stands on the green?


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#8 Josh Pickering

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 12:52 PM

Hi Stephen,

 

We had the actor standing about 25 ft in front of the 20x40 greenscreen. She wasn't standing on any green, which made it difficult sometimes for wide shots. We had to go very low to get the "ankles" up shot we wanted. I am attaching pictures now. These are just jpg's that have been compressed, but nothing treated. I had 2 6K spacelights lighting the GS. They were wrapped with 1/4 CTB. I had 1 2K Mickey on each backside of her for an edge, 3/4's off back to be exact. I keyed her with a 10K Tenor through an 8x8 bleached muslin. No CTB on the 10K. Then for fill I used a Kino Diva 400 which was dimmed quite a bit, and it was full tungsten 32 bulbs.


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#9 Josh Pickering

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Posted 19 February 2013 - 01:04 PM

I can't seem to upload them. Stand by.


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Visual Products

Glidecam

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