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Please critique my first attempt at lighting.


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#1 RT Plumley

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Posted 02 February 2013 - 11:55 PM

Hi all, I spent the day attempting to light a scene; would appreciate your critiques and feedback.
I understand the focus is off - was concentrating on how to light a scene.

Thanks in advance!

RT

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  • interior_still.jpg

Edited by RT Plumley, 02 February 2013 - 11:56 PM.

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#2 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 12:22 AM

Do you have a clip? A screenshot doesnt say much.
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#3 RT Plumley

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Posted 03 February 2013 - 09:49 AM

Uploaded on Vimeo:


I'll post a higher quality one from today's shoot later on.

Setup:
http://i.imgur.com/0loRkKF.jpg?1
http://i.imgur.com/Ly7ngEk.jpg?1
http://i.imgur.com/uKD898M.jpg?1
http://i.imgur.com/p4uTutt.jpg?1

Edited by RT Plumley, 03 February 2013 - 09:50 AM.

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#4 Patrick Nuse

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 02:14 AM

What mood are you going for? I would need to know that first if I was to judge anything. One thing that stands out though is that the characters and the background are lit very similar and they blend in with the background. Whatever look you are going for, you typically will always want to make sure you seperate your actors from the background. Since the background is not likely telling us anything important I would cut that light down first and use a cookie infront of the background light to put a soft pattern of some sort there and probably darker than the lighting on your actors. Then you could also add a rim light shooting from behind the actors to help seperate them from the background. (basic 3 point lighting concepts, nothing fancy) but that would be a starting point.
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#5 Patrick Nuse

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 02:20 AM

Also you should cut down one of you keys. One of the lights in the front should really only be a fill. The ratio of the key and fill will typically set the mood of the scene. If they are both the same intensity, your characters will tend to look "flat". With the key providing the majority of the exposure and filling the other side with a few stops less light will give more dimention and depth to your characters and tends to be much more flattering.
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#6 Patrick Nuse

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Posted 04 February 2013 - 02:49 AM

I lit this scene with a 36" soft box for key and a 12" diffuser gel for the fill. The fill was 3 stops less than the fill. Both lights were about 4' away from the actors.532.jpg
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Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

Opal

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Abel Cine

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

Technodolly

FJS International, LLC

Rig Wheels Passport